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Winter 2016 IASSIST Quarterly Posted

Editor’s Notes
When things get digital and huge. Doing the things right and doing the right things.


Welcome to the fourth issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:4, 2016).


There is a lot of management involved in the data management carried out at data archives and with data collections. The phrase 'Doing the things right and doing the right things' belongs to fathers of modern management and is used to distinguish management vs. leadership, efficiency vs. effectiveness, and tactics vs. strategy. The winning authors of the 2016 lASSIST paper competition used the article 'More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing' (Mark A. Greene and Dennis Meissner, 2005) as their starting point for investigating the 'More Product, Less Process' (MPLP) approach for digital data. The winning paper 'More Data, Less Process? The Applicability of MPLP to Research Data' is written by Sophia Lafferty-Hess and Thu-Mai Christian. The authors work at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as Research Data Manager and Assistant Director of Archives. The paper was presented in the session 'Data Management Archiving/Curation Platforms' at the IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen.


In their paper Lafferty-Hess and Christian set out to apply the principles and concepts formulated in MPLP to the archiving of digital research data. They discuss data quality, usability, preservation and access, leading to the question: What is the ‘golden minimum’ for archiving digital data? In terms of data archiving, spending too much effort on doing the things right may bring the trade-off problem that the resources are not sufficient to do all the things. Users in the digital world retrieve and consume lots of information by themselves, but digital data comes in forms that are seldom directly consumable without additional processing. When the authors also relate the phrase 'golden minimum' to the phrase 'good enough', management is again brought into the discussion. In my view, the short formulation of Herbert Simon's ‘satisficing’ concept in his theory of bounded rationality is 'good enough is best'. Lafferty-Hess and Christian are aware that shifting responsibility for certain data curation tasks from the data archive to the data producer and to the data user can present problems. Their best advice and hope for the future is that additional 'future research will help us build better understanding of the connection between user needs and data curation processes'.


The following paper 'MMRepo - Storing qualitative and quantitative data into one big data repository' is authored by Ingo Barkow, Catharina Wasner and Fabian Odoni, working at University of Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland HTW Chur where Barkow is Associate Professor and Wasner and Odoni are research associates. They describe a prototype of their MMRepo project that addresses the problem of storing qualitative large binary objects with regular quantitative data in order to achieve the advantage of storing mixed mode data in the same infrastructure, whereby only one system needs to be provided and maintained. Linking to the first paper they are looking into the efficiency problem of doing the things right. When you are efficient you can do more things right. The project is trying to achieve this by combining CERN’s Invenio portal with a Hadoop 2.0 cluster and DDI 3.3. The prototype was successful and the project continues. The paper was presented at the IASSIST 2016 conference in the session ‘Technical Data Infrastructure Frameworks’.


Aidan Condron works with the Big Data Network Support team at the UK Data Service. At the IASSIST 2016 conference he presented ‘Data Science: The Future of Social Science?’ at the session ‘Big Data, Big Science', and has submitted this presentation as the paper 'Servicing New and Novel Forms of Data: Opportunities for Social Science'. These ‘new and novel’ forms are, for example, social media data that present potential resources for researchers but also pose challenges for access provision and analysis. The paper introduces Data Service as a Platform (DSaaP), which is a project to establish technological infrastructure support. As with the MMRepo project, the DSaaP project will include both familiar and new and novel forms of data. The novel forms of data are often huge, and 'Hadoop' solutions are also at play here using a data lake built through use of open source software. The article also gives several demonstrations through graphs of energy consumption based on 3.7 billion datapoints. After the presentation and the paper, the Big Data Network Support team will standardise and generalise the procedures developed from their DSaaP project.


Submissions of papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.


Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:
http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors


Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.


Karsten Boye Rasmussen

July 2017

Editor

IQ Volume 40 Issue 3 now available

Issue 40(3) is now online at http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/issue/40/3.

Editor’s Notes

Being international - and proud of it!

IASSIST is proud of being international. These days some us of find it important to emphasize how international collaboration has improved and made our lives more efficient. In the small but around-the-globe-reaching world of IASSIST, many national data archives have come into existence as well as continuing their development, through friendly international support and spreading of knowledge and good practices among IASSISTers. So let us cherish the 'International' in IASSIST. We are proud of the lead 'I' for 'International' in the IASSIST acronym and have no intention of changing that to 'N' for 'National'. It is also my impression that data archives all over the world simply don't have the facilities for storing 'alternative facts' as they are shy of all kinds of documentation.

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:3, 2016). Four papers with authors from three continents are presented in this issue. The paper 'Demonstrating Repository Trustworthiness through the Data Seal of Approval' is a summary of a panel session at the IASSIST 2015 conference in Minneapolis with panel members Stuart Macdonald, Ingrid Dillo, Sophia Lafferty-Hess, Lynn Woolfrey, and Mary Vardigan. The paper has an introduction from DANS in the Netherlands where the Data Seal of Approval (DSA) originated. Cases from the US and South Africa are presented and the future of the DSA including possible harmonization with other systems is discussed. DSA certifications are basically consumer guidance, clearly assisting all the involved parties. Depositors and funding bodies will be assured that data are reliably stored, researchers can reliably access the data repositories, and repositories are supported in their work of archiving and distribution of data.

The second article brings us to the actual use of data. From the UK Data Service, Rebecca Parsons and Scott Summers in 'The Role of Case Studies in Effective Data Sharing, Reuse and Impact' take us into positive narratives around secondary data. The background is that although the publishing of data is now recognised by funders, the authors find that ‘showcasing’ brings motivation for data sharing and reuse as well as improving the quality of data and documentation. The impact of case studies is all-sided and research, depositing data, and the brand recognition of the UK Data Service are among the areas investigated. The future is likely to include new case studies developed for use in teaching in schools, with easy linking to datasets, as well as for researchers being assisted to build their own portfolios. The appendix presents case studies on research and impact.

In the third article, we are situated in data creation. Muhammad F. Bhuiyan and Paula Lackie from Carleton College in Minnesota write on 'Mitigating Survey Fraud and Human Error: Lessons Learned from A Low Budget Village Census in Bangladesh'. As the 'fraud' term implies, they are looking into the problem of data creators being too creative, but more importantly they are investigating the essential area of data quality. The authors explain how selected technological assets like the use of geographic information systems (GIS) and audio-capturing smart pens improved data quality. The use of these tools is exemplified through many scenarios described in the paper. Furthermore, a procedure of daily monitoring and fast transcription lead to quick surveyor re-training and dismissal of others, thus minimising data errors. For those interested in false data and its detection, the introduction in particular has valuable references to literature.

In the last paper the difficult task of handling images is addressed in 'Image Management as a Data Service' by Berenica Vejvoda, K. Jane Burpee, and Paula Lackie. Vejvoda and Burpee work at McGill University in Montreal. You have already met Lackie from Carleton College in relation to the third paper above. The 'images' in the article are digital images, and the authors suggest that the knowledge of digital data services across the 'research data lifecycle' also benefits the management of digital images. Digital images are numerical data, and the article compares the data, metadata, and paradata of a survey respondent to the information on a digital image. Considerations from normal data concerning system formats and storage space also apply to management of images. In the last section the paper introduces copyright issues that are complicated, to say the least. Just as reuse of normal data can have ethical angles, it is even more apparent that images can have complicated issues of privacy and confidentiality.

Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistd ata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

January 2017

Editor

IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) volume 40-2 is now on the website: Revolution in the air

Welcome to the second issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:2, 2016). We present three papers in this issue.

http://iassistdata.org/iq/issue/40/2

First, there are two papers on the Data Documentation Initiative that have their own special introduction. I want to express my respect and gratitude to Joachim Wackerow (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences). Joachim (Achim) and Mary Vardigan (University of Michigan) have several times and for many years communicated to and advised the readers of the IASSIST Quarterly on the continuing development of the DDI. The metadata of data is central for the use and reuse of data, and we have come a long way through the efforts of many people.    

The IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen was a great success - I am told. I was not able to attend but heard that the conference again was 'the best ever'. I was also told that among the many interesting talks and inputs at the conference Matthew Woollard's keynote speech on 'Data Revolution' was high on the list. Good to have well informed informers! Matthew Woollard is Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. Here in the IASSIST Quarterly we bring you a transcript of his talk. Woollard starts his talk on the data revolution with the possibility of bringing to users access to data, rather than bringing data to users. The data is in the 'cloud' - in the air - 'Revolution in the air' to quote a Nobel laureate. We are not yet in the post-revolutionary phase and many issues still need to be addressed. Woollard argues that several data skills are in demand, like an understanding of data management and of the many ethical issues. Although he is not enthusiastic about the term 'Big Data', Woollard naturally addresses the concept as these days we cannot talk about data - and surely not about data revolution - without talking about Big Data. I fully support his view that we should proceed with caution, so that we are not simply replacing surveys where we 'ask more from fewer' with big data that give us 'less from more'. The revolution gives us new possibilities, and we will see more complex forms of research that will challenge data skills and demand solutions at data service institutions.  

Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen   
Editor, IASSIST Quarterly

IASSIST 2017 Call for Proposals Now Open!

We are delighted to announce the call for proposals for the IASSIST 2017 Conference.

IASSIST 2017 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Data in the Middle: The common language of research

The 43rd annual conference of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) will be held in Lawrence, Kansas from May 23-26, 2017. #iassist17

Many issues around data (sources, strategies, and tools) are similar across disciplines. While IASSIST has its roots in social science data, it has also welcomed discussions over the years of other disciplines' issues as they relate to data, data management, and support of users. So again this year, in line with this tradition, we are arranging a conference that will benefit those who support researchers across all disciplines: social sciences, health and natural sciences, and humanities. Please join the international data community in Lawrence, KS, "in the middle" of the U.S., for insights and discussion on how data in all disciplines are found, shared, used, and managed. Join us and draw inspiration from this diverse gathering! 

We welcome submissions for papers, presentations, panels, posters, and pecha kuchas.

The full Call for Proposals, along with the link to the submission form, can be accessed on the conference website here: 

http://www.iassist17.dept.ku.edu/proposals/

Questions can be directed to the Program Chairs, Samantha Guss and Michele Hayslett, at iassist2017@gmail.com.

 

Pre-conference Workshops

We are also accepting submissions for Pre-conference Workshops under a separate Call for Workshops, which can be accessed here: 

http://www.iassist17.dept.ku.edu/proposals/workshops/

Questions about workshops may be sent to the Workshop Coordinators, Jenny Muilenburg (jmuil@uw.edu) and Andy Rutkowski (arutkowski@library.ucla.edu).

 

Deadline for all submissions: 21 November 2016.

Notification of acceptance: February 2017.

IQ 40:1 Now Available!

Our World and all the Local Worlds
Welcome to the first issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST
Quarterly (IQ 40:1, 2016). We present four papers in this issue.
The first paper presents data from our very own world,
extracted from papers published in the IQ through four
decades. What is published in the IQ is often limited in
geographical scope and in this issue the other three papers
present investigations and project research carried out at
New York University, Purdue University, and the Federal
Reserve System. However, the subject scope of the papers
and the methods employed bring great diversity. And
although the papers are local in origin they all have a strong
focus for generalization in order to spread the information
and experience.


We proudly present the paper that received the 'best
paper award' at the IASSIST conference 2015. Great thanks
are expressed to all the reviewers who took part in the
evaluation! In the paper 'Social Science Data Archives: A
Historical Social Network Analysis' the authors Kristin R.
Eschenfelder (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Morgaine
Gilchrist Scott, Kalpana Shankar, and Greg Downey
are reporting on inter-organizational influence and
collaboration among social science data archives through
data of articles published in IASSIST Quarterly in 1976
to 2014. The paper demonstrates social network analysis
(SNA) using a web of 'nodes' (people/authors/institutions)
and 'links' (relationships between nodes). Several types
of relationships are identified: influencing, collaborating,
funding, and international. The dynamics are shown in
detail by employing five year sections. I noticed that from
a reluctant start the amount of relationships has grown
significantly and archives have continuously grown better
at bringing in 'influence' from other 'nodes'. The paper
contributes to the history of social science data archives and
the shaping of a research discipline.


The paper 'Understanding Academic Patrons’ Data Needs
through Virtual Reference Transcripts: Preliminary Findings
from New York University Libraries' is authored by Margaret
Smith and Jill Conte who are both librarians at New York
University, and Samantha Guss, a librarian at University
of Richmond who worked at New York University from
2009-14. The goal of their paper is 'to contribute to the
growing body of knowledge about how information
needs are conceptualized and articulated, and how this
knowledge can be used to improve data reference in an
academic library setting'. This is carried out by analysis of
chat transcripts of requests for census data at NYU. There is
a high demand for the virtual services of the NYU Libraries
and there are as many as 15,000 annual chat transactions.
There has not been much qualitative research of users'
data needs, but here the authors exemplify the iterative
nature of grounded theory with data collection and analysis
processes inextricably entwined and also using a range of
software tools like FileLocator Pro, TextCrawler, and Dedoose.
Three years of chat reference transcripts were filtered down
to 147 transcripts related to United States and international
census data. The unique data provides several insights,
shown in the paper. However, the authors are also aware of
the limitations in the method as it did not include whether
the patron or librarian considered the interaction successful.
The conclusion is that there is a need for additional librarian
training and improved research guides.


The third paper is also from a university. Amy Barton, Paul
J. Bracke, Ann Marie Clark, all from Purdue University,
collaborated on the paper 'Digitization, Data Curation,
and Human Rights Documents: Case Study of a Library
Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration'. The project
concerns the digitization of Urgent Action Bulletins of
Amnesty International from 1974 to 2007. The political
science research centered on changes of transnational
human rights advocacy and legal instrumentation, while
the Libraries’ research related to data management,
metadata, data lifecycle, etcetera. The specific research
collaboration model developed was also generalized for
future practitioner-librarian collaboration projects. The
project is part of a recent tendency where academic
libraries will improve engagement and combine activities
between libraries and users and institutions. The project
attempts to integrate two different lifecycle models thus
serving both research and curatorial goals where the
central question is: 'can digitization processes be designed
in a manner that feeds directly into analytical workflows
of social science researchers, while still meeting the
needs of the archive or library concerned with long-term
stewardship of the digitized content?'. The project builds
on data of Urgent Action Bulletins produced by Amnesty
International for indication of how human rights concerns
changed over time, and the threats in different countries
at different periods, as well as combining library standards
for digitization and digital collections with researcher-driven
metadata and coding strategies. The data creation
started with the scanning and creation of the optical
character recognized (OCR) version of full text PDFs for text
recognition and modeling in NVivo software. The project
did succeed in developing shared standards. However, a
fundamental challenge was experienced in the grant-driven
timelines for both library and researcher. It seems to me that
the expectation of parallel work was the challenge to the
project. Things take time.


In the fourth paper we enter the case of the Federal Reserve
System. San Cannon and Deng Pan, working at the Federal
Reserve Bank in Kansas City and Chicago, created a pilot
for an infrastructure and workflow support for making the
publication of research data a regular part of the research
lifecycle. This is reported in the paper 'First Forays into
Research Data Dissemination: A Tale from the Kansas City
Fed'. More than 750 researchers across the system produce
yearly about 1,000 journal articles, working papers, etcetera.
The need for data to support the research has been
recognized, and the institution is setting up a repository
and defining a workflow to support data preservation
and future dissemination. In early 2015 the internal Center
for the Advancement of Research and Data in Economics
(CADRE) was established with a mission to support, enhance,
and advance data or computationally intensive research,
and preservation and dissemination were identified as
important support functions for CADRE. The paper presents
details and questions in the design such as types of
collections, kind and size of data files, and demonstrates
influence of testers and curators. The pilot also had to
decide on the metadata fields to be used when data is
submitted to the system. The complete setup including
incorporated fields was enhanced through pilot testing and
user feedback. The pilot is now being expanded to other
Federal Reserve Banks.


Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome.
We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or
papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time
presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors
'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in
your local repository. Chairing a conference session with
the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a
special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information
reaches many more people than the session participants,
and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at
http://www.iassistdata.org.


Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions
and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.
Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for
the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear
from you.


Karsten Boye Rasmussen
June 2016
Editor

Sr. Policy Analyst for European data policy issues (Brussels)

Topic:

Senior Policy Analyst
The Center for Data Innovation, a Washington, DC-based non-profit, non-partisan public policy think tank, is recruiting a senior policy analyst to join its team as a full-time consultant to focus on European data policy issues. The position will be based in Brussels.

Latest Issue of IQ Available! Data Documentation Initiative - Results, Tools, and Further Initiatives

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 39 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 39:3, 2015). This special issue is guest edited by Joachim Wackerow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA. That sentence is a direct plagiarism from the editor’s notes of the recent double issue (IQ 38:4 & 39:1). We are very grateful for all the work Mary and Achim have carried out and are developing further in the continuing story of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), and for their efforts in presenting the work here in the ASSIST Quarterly.

As in the recent double issue on DDI this special issue also presents results, tools, and further initiatives. The DDI started 20 years ago and much has been accomplished. However, creative people are still refining and improving it, as well as developing new areas for the use of DDI.

Mary Vardigan and Joachim Wackerow give on the next page an overview of the content of DDI papers in this issue.

Let me then applaud the two guest editors and also the many authors who made this possible:

  • Alerk Amin, RAND Cooperation, www.rand.org, USA
  • Ingo Barkow, Associate Professor for Data Management at the University for Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland (HTW Chur), Switzerland
  • Stefan Kramer, American University, Washington, DC, USA
  • David Schiller, Research Data Centre (FDZ) of the German Federal Employment Agency (BA) at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
  • Jeremy Williams, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, USA
  • Larry Hoyle, senior scientist at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas, USA
  • Joachim Wackerow, metadata expert at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany
  • William Poynter, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jennifer Spiegel, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jay Greenfield, health informatics architect working with data standards, USA
  • Sam Hume, vice president of SHARE Technology and Services at CDISC, USA
  • Sanda Ionescu, user support for data and documentation, ICPSR, USA
  • Jeremy Iverson, co-founder and partner at Colectica, USA
  • John Kunze, systems architect at the California Digital Library, USA
  • Barry Radler, researcher at the University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging, USA
  • Wendy Thomas, director of the Data Access Core in the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) at the University of Minnesota, USA
  • Mary Vardigan, archivist at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), USA
  • Stuart Weibel, worked in OCLC Research, USA
  • Michael Witt, associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, USA.

I hope you will enjoy their work in this issue, and I am certain that the contact authors will enjoy hearing from you
about new potential results, tools, and initiatives.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors. Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen
September 2015
Editor

New Perspectives on DDI

This issue features four papers that look at leveraging the structured metadata provided by DDI in
different ways. The first, “Design Considerations for DDI-Based Data Systems,“ aims to help decisionmakers
by highlighting the approach of using relational databases for data storage in contrast to
representing DDI in its native XML format. The second paper, “DDI as a Common Format for Export
and Import for Statistical Packages,” describes an experiment using the program Stat/Transfer to
move datasets among five popular packages with DDI Lifecycle as an intermediary format. The paper
“Protocol Development for Large-Scale Metadata Archiving Using DDI Lifecycle” discusses the use
of a DDI profile to document CLOSER (Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources,
www.closer.ac.uk), which brings together nine of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies by producing a
metadata discovery platform (MDP). And finally, “DDI and Enhanced Data Citation“ reports on efforts in
extend data citation information in DDI to include a larger set of elements and a taxonomy for the role
of research contributors.

Mary Vardigan - vardigan@umich.edu
Joachim Wackerow - Joachim.Wackerow@gesis.org

IASSIST Quarterly back issues all online

Dear Friends,

The IASSIST Communications Committee is very happy to announce that the back issues of IQ--ALL of the back issues, back to 1976--are now available on the IASSIST web site.  In the left sidebar where you are able to select from a few back issues, you may recall there is a link at the bottom to More issues.  That link can now transport you back to the early days of the association.  Older issues are wonderful to peruse, offering a window into how far we've come and at the same time putting in perspective the many on-going issues with which we're still grappling, all these years later.  Please take a moment to take a walk down memory lane and reflect on the past and future of IASSIST.  And please congratulate Robin Rice and Harrison Dekker for all their work in getting these issues online.

All the Best,

Michele Hayslett

For the Communications Committee

Data Viz Position at UNC at Chapel Hill

Topic:

Please see the announcement below for a new position created here in the Libraries at UNC at Chapel Hill.  It will be based in our Digital Research Services Department (you’d get to work with me and a bunch of other great people!) supporting the mission of our Research Hub in Davis Library.  Note that there is a requirement for an advanced degree, but a master’s or PhD in a related subject field is admissible in place of a library degree.  Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

Michele Hayslett

michele_hayslett@unc.edu

======================

Data Visualization Services Librarian

Available: March 1, 2016

UNC Chapel Hill invites applications for the position of Data Visualization Services Librarian in the Digital Research Services department. Based in the Davis Library Research Hub, the Data Visualization Services Librarian is responsible for expanding data analysis and visualization services in support of teaching and research.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian:

  • Advises, consults, instructs, and serves as technical lead on data visualization projects with UNC students and faculty from all academic disciplines.
  • Identifies, evaluates and recommends new and emerging digital research tools for the Libraries and UNC research community.
  • Develops and supports visualization services in response to current trends, campus needs and Libraries priorities.
  • Shares ideas and concepts effectively across diverse interdisciplinary audiences and serves as the point person for data visualization and analysis efforts in the Libraries.
  • Develops relationships with campus units supporting digital research, including the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian works with staff from the Digital Research Services and Library Information & Technology departments to identify hardware and software needs, and to develop scalable, sustainable practices related to data visualization services. The librarian designs and delivers workshops and training sessions on data visualization tools and methods, and develops a range of instructional materials to support patrons with data visualization needs.

The Data Visualization Services Librarian may share some program coordination responsibilities with other Research Hub staff and may supervise student employees.

Qualifications

Required

  • ALA-accredited master’s degree in Library or Information Science OR advanced degree in Geography, Sociology, Psychology, Design, Informatics, Statistics, or a related field.
  • Demonstrated experience with data visualization tools and programming libraries.
  • Proficiency with at least one programming language (such as Python, Ruby, JavaScript, Java, R).
  • Ability to use a variety of tools to extract and manipulate data from various sources (such as relational databases, XML, web services and APIs).
  • Demonstrated technical expertise and experience using technology to support research and teaching.
  • Experience providing instruction or research consultations.
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills.
  • Strong commitment to public service.

Preferred

Experience working effectively with a team to plan and complete projects.

  • Background working in a large academic library.
  • Experience supporting data analysis and visualization in a research setting.
  • Proficiency using tools and programming libraries to support text analysis.
  • Familiarity with geospatial technology.
  • Experience identifying and recommending new tools or technologies.
  • Graphic design skills and proficiency using relevant software.

The University and The Libraries

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the country’s oldest state university. UNC Chapel Hill has an enrollment of approximately 29,000 students, employs more than 3,500 members of the faculty, and offers 69 doctoral degrees as well as professional degrees in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy and law. The UNC Health Sciences Library is a recognized leader within the Association of Academic Health Science Libraries.  University Library collections include over 6.5 million volumes. The Library is a member of the Association of Research Libraries and the Center for Research Libraries. Together with the libraries at Duke University, North Carolina Central University, and North Carolina State University, the members of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) provide services and collections to their students, faculty, and staff in support of the education, research, and service missions of the universities.

The University Library invests proudly in its employees, strives to create a diverse environment of respect and collaboration, and encourages vision and innovation.

The Region

The Triangle region is one of the most desirable places to live and work in North America and offers its residents a wide array of recreational, cultural, and intellectual activities. The mountains or the seashore are less than half day’s drive from Chapel Hill.

The University of North Carolina is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff.

Salary and Benefits

This is twelve-month academic librarian appointment.  Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Standard state benefits of annual leave, sick leave, and State or optional retirement plan.

Deadline for Application

Review of applications will begin on February 11, 2016. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, but preference will be given to applications received by the begin review date.

To Apply

Please visit http://unc.peopleadmin.com/postings/90462 and complete the online application. Please include a letter of application, a resume and the name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of three professional references, one of whom must be a current supervisor.  Additionally, please indicate in your cover letter where you first learned of this position.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an equal opportunity employer that welcomes all to apply, including protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.

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IQ double issue 38(4)/39(1) is up, and so is vol 39(2)!

Hi folks!  A lovely gift for your reading pleasure over the holidays, we present two, yes, TWO issues of the IASSIST Quarterly.  The first is the double issue, 38(4)/39(1) with guest editors, Joachim Wacherow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA.  This issue focuses on the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) and how it makes meta-analysis possible.  The second issue is 39(2), and is all about data:  avoiding statistical disclosure, using data, and improving digital preservation.  Although we usually post the full text of the Editor's Notes in the blog post, it seems lengthy to do that for both issues.  You will find them, though, on the web site: the Editor's Notes for the double issue, and the Editor's Notes for issue 39(2).

Michele Hayslett, for the IQ Publications Committee

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...