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ANES Announcement: : Deadlines for the ANES 2010-2012 EGSS Online Commons Proposals

The American National Election Studies are continuing to accept proposals for the ANES 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study. The deadline to submit proposals for EGSS 4 is 3:00p.m. EDT, August 30, 2011. The deadline for members of the Online Commons community to comment on proposals is September 8, 2011. The deadline for revisions to proposals is at 3:00p.m. EDT on September 14, 2011. For additional information about how to submit a proposal, please visit: http://www.electionstudies.org/

Proposals may be submitted through the ANES Online Commons. The following describes the goals of this study and proposal process.

About The 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study

The overarching theme of the surveys is citizen attitudes about government and society. These Internet surveys represent the most cost-effective way for the ANES user community to gauge political perceptions during one of the most momentous periods in American history. Aside from the historic nature of the current administration and the almost unprecedented economic crisis facing the country, we believe it is imperative that researchers assess attitudes about politics and society in the period leading up to the 2012 national elections. Potential topics include: attitudes about the performance of the Obama administration on the major issues of the day, evaluations of Congress and the Supreme Court, identification with and attitudes about the major political parties, and levels of interest in and engagement with national politics. This is primarily because these perceptions are unmistakably correlated with both presidential vote choice and levels of political participation. We intend to measure each of these topics at multiple points throughout the two-year period preceding the

2012 elections. In addition to these subjects, we envision that each of these surveys would explore a particular aspect of these political perceptions.

This Study includes five rolling cross-section surveys that will allow us the opportunity to pilot new items for possible inclusion on the 2012 time series. Proposals for the first three surveys of the study were accepted earlier this year. The first survey of the study was conducted in October 2010; the second survey was conducted in the Spring of 2011. The third survey will be in the field later this year. We are currently accepting proposals for the final two surveys of the study. The fourth survey will be conducted in early 2012 and the final survey will be in the field in the middle of 2012. For the timelines and deadlines for the remaining surveys, please see http://electionstudies.org/studypages/2010_2012EGSS/2010_2012EGSScalendar.htm

By offering multiple opportunities for the user community to place their items on one or more surveys, we are providing the capacity to survey on a diverse set of topics that are relevant to a wide set of research communities. Lastly, the flexibility of these surveys as to both content and timing will allow the ANES to respond promptly to emerging political issues in this volatile period in our country's history.

About the Online Commons

The design of the questionnaires for The 2010-2012 Evaluations of Government and Society Study will evolve from proposals and comments submitted to the Online Commons (OC). The OC is an online system designed to promote communication among scholars and to yield innovative proposals about the most effective ways to measure electorally-relevant concepts and relationships. The goal of the OC is to improve the quality and scientific value of ANES data collections, to encourage the submission of new ideas, and to make such experiences more beneficial to and enjoyable for investigators. In the last study cycle, more than 700 scholars sent over 200 proposals through the Online Commons.

Proposals for the inclusion of questions must include clear theoretical and empirical rationales. All proposals must also clearly state how the questions will increase the value of the respective studies. In particular, proposed questions must have the potential to help scholars understand the causes and/or consequences of turnout or candidate choice.

For more information about the criteria that will be used to evaluate proposals, please see http://www.electionstudies.org/studypages/2010_2012EGSS/2010_2012EGSScriteria.htm

For additional information on how to submit a proposal, please see http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/proposalsubmit.htm

ANES Announcement: The ANES 2012 Time Series Study

On June 30, 2011, the American National Election Studies (ANES) began accepting proposals for questions to include on the ANES 2012 Time Series Study.  Proposals may be submitted through the ANES Online Commons. The following describes the goals of this study and the opportunity to include questions on it.

About The ANES 2012 Time Series Study

The ANES’s core mission is to promote cutting-edge and broadly-collaborative research on American national elections. The heart of the ANES is its presidential year time series surveys. The time series legacy is well known, serving as a model for election studies around the world and having generated thousands of publications. Every four years, a large representative sample of American adults has been interviewed on two occasions, first between Labor Day and Election Day, and again between Election Day and the onset of the winter holidays. The two face-to-face interviews will last approximately one hour each in 2012. Pre-election interviews focus on candidate preferences and anticipated vote choice; an array of possible predictors of candidate preferences, turnout, citizen engagement; and an array of indicators of cognitive and behavioral engagement in the information flow of the campaign. Post-election interviews measures a variety of behavioral experiences people might have had throughout the campaign (e.g., turnout, mobilization efforts), plus additional posited predictors of candidate preferences, turnout, and citizen engagement.

Some of the questions asked during these interviews are categorized as standard (also known as core) items, meaning that they have been asked regularly over the years.  These questions are scheduled to appear on subsequent editions of the ANES Time Series in order to permit comparisons across elections.  The purpose of categorizing items as standard is to assure scholars who conduct longitudinal analyses that they can continue to depend on ANES to include variables that have been shown to perform well in the past.

Although recognizing the importance of continuity, ANES has also sought to develop the time series in innovative ways. The non-standard component of each questionnaire has routinely focused on matters of interest to the current election cycle. These items are often selected from an "ANES Question Inventory," which includes the standard questions and questions that have been asked in past ANES surveys but are not part of the standard battery of questions.  Researchers can access the question inventory at:

ftp://ftp.electionstudies.org/ftp/anes/OC/CoreUtility/ALT2010core.htm

The non-standard content of questionnaires has varied over the years. For example, candidate positions on issues of government policy are recognized as predictors of candidate preferences, but two one-hour interviews do not permit measuring positions on all of the many issues enjoying government attention at any one time in history. So from year to year, different choices have been made about which issues to include in the questionnaire.

As in the past, ANES will continue to emphasize best practices in sample design, respondent recruitment, and interviewing.  As always, we aim to provide top-quality service in many respects, including: (1) the careful and extensive planning that must be done before the field work begins, (2) the hard work that will be done by interviewers, supervisors, and study managers during data collection to monitor productivity and make adjustments in strategy to maximize the quality of the final product, and (3) the extensive data processing efforts (including integration of an extensive contextual data file) that will be required to assemble and document the final data set.

 

About the Online Commons

Content for the ANES 2012 Time Series Study will primarily evolve from two sources:  previous ANES Time Series questionnaires and new proposals received via the ANES Online Commons (OC).  The OC is an Internet-based system designed to promote communication among scholars and to yield innovative proposals about the most effective ways to measure electorally-relevant concepts and relationships. The goal of the OC is to improve the quality and scientific value of ANES data collections, to encourage the submission of new ideas, and to make such experiences more beneficial to and enjoyable for investigators. In the last study cycle, more than 700 scholars sent over 200 proposals through the OC.

Proposals for the inclusion of questions must include clear theoretical and empirical rationales. All proposals must also clearly state how the questions will increase the value of the respective studies. In particular, proposed questions must have the potential to help scholars understand the causes and/or consequences of turnout or candidate choice.

The ANES Online Commons will accept proposals until 3:00pm Eastern Time on August 30, 2011. The deadline for members of the Online Commons community to comment on proposals is September 8, 2011. The deadline for revisions to proposals is at 3:00pm Eastern Time on September 14, 2011.

For additional information about how to submit a proposal, please visit:

http://www.electionstudies.org/

 

Proposal Evaluation Criteria

The following criteria will guide the PIs and the ANES Board in evaluating proposals made through the Online Commons. We strongly encourage anyone who is considering making a proposal to read the following carefully.

1. Problem-Relevant. Are the theoretical motivations, proposed concepts and survey items relevant to ongoing controversies among researchers? How will the data that the proposers expect to observe advance the debate?

What specific analyses of the data will be performed? What might these analyses reveal? How would these findings be relevant to specific questions or controversies?

2. Suitability to ANES. The primary mission of the ANES is to advance our understanding of voter choice and electoral participation. Ceteris paribus, concepts and instrumentation that are relevant to our understanding of these phenomena will be considered more favorably than items tapping other facets of politics, public opinion, American culture or society.

3. Building on Solid Theoretical Footing. Does the proposed instrumentation follow from a plausible theory of political behavior?

4. Demonstrated Validity and Reliability of Proposed Items. Proposed items should be accompanied by evidence demonstrating their validity and reliability. Validity has various facets: e.g., construct validity, concurrent validity, discriminant validity and predictive validity. Any assessment of predictive validity should keep in mind criterion 2, above.

Reliability can be demonstrated in various ways; one example is test-retest reliability. We understand that proposals for novel concepts and/or instrumentation will almost always lack empirical evidence demonstrating validity and/or reliability. Proposals for truly "novel" instrumentation might be best suited for the series of smaller, cross-sectional studies ANES will field in the period 2010 through the summer of 2012; as a general matter, we are highly unlikely to field untested instrumentation on the Fall 2012 pre-election and post-election surveys.

5. Breadth of Relevance and Generalizability. Will the research that results from the proposed instrumentation be useful to many scholars?

Given the broad usage of ANES data, we may be unable to accommodate requests to include items that are relevant for one -or only a few- hypothesis tests. Ceteris paribus, items that are potentially relevant for a wide range of analyses will be considered more favorably than items that would seem to have less applicability.

When the 2012 questionnaires are designed, the status of the standard questions will be central considerations. Standard questions do not have an infinite shelf life -- Science advances and new insights can reveal more effective ways of asking important questions or can show that some questions do not in fact meet the requirements of remaining a standard question.  However, proposed changes made to standard questions will be scrutinized with recognition of the value of continuity over time.  While we will welcome proposals to change standard questions, the burden of proof required for making such changes will be high. We will take most seriously arguments that are backed by concrete evidence and strong theory.

All proposals that include a change to a particular question (standard or non-standard) should name the specific question that would be altered and provide a full explanation as to why the ANES user community will benefit by such a change.

Tools To Assist Your Proposal Development

As previously mentioned, researchers can access the ANES Question Inventory at:

ftp://ftp.electionstudies.org/ftp/anes/OC/CoreUtility/ALT2010core.htm

This Inventory provides the list of standard and non-standard questions that have been part of the Time Series, and includes frequencies for the most recent studies.

We have also created a second resource to review questions that have been asked previously.  The ANES Time Series Codebook Search utility searches existing codebooks from studies in the ANES Time Series.   You can access the utility at http://ftp.nes.isr.umich.edu/backup/searchhelp.htm  

(Please note that there are some limitations to the utility that are documented on the search help page, the link to that page is at the top of the utility page.)

We hope that you will find these tools useful as you prepare your proposals.

The opportunity to submit proposals is open to anyone who wants to make a constructive contribution to the development of the ANES 2012 Time Series Study. Feel free to pass this invitation along to anyone (e.g., your colleagues and students) who you think might be interested. We hope to hear from you.

For additional resources and information on how to submit a proposal, please visit http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/

 

Darrell Donakowski

Director of Studies

American National Election Studies (ANES)

10 significant visualisation developments

Interesting collection of visualization developments:

 

10 significant visualisation developments: January to June 2011 Visualising Data (July 7th, 2011)

Videos from the IASSIST 2011 Plenaries

Hello - for those who were not able to attend IASSIST 2011 and for those asking to have access to video presentations, the two videos of the Plenaries from IASSIST 2011 are now available for viewing:

Chuck Humphrey - Data Library Coordinator, University of Alberta
Research Data Infrastructure: Are the Social Sciences on Main Street or a Side Road?

Chuck Humphrey is passionate about data and has been examining research data infrastructure with a global perspective. His talk will locate the social sciences in the broader E-science picture and give us a glimpse of the future.

Plenary II 

Date: Thursday, June 02 

Video   

 

Andrea Reimer - Councillor, City of Vancouver
Open Data in Vancouver: The Inspiration and the Vision


Andrea Reimer is a Councillor for the city of Vancouver and is a passionate advocate for democracy and civic engagement. The City of Vancouver has led the way with the adoption of a resolution in May [2009] that endorsed open and accessible data, open standards, and open source software. Ms Reimer has been heavily involved in this initiative and will share her passion with IASSIST.

Plenary III 

Date: Friday, June 03 

Video

 

The QuickTime .mov files are available in a variety of viewing formats: via desktops, iPhone, iPod, iPad, smartphones.

We have had various and mixed reports on streaming successes. These are large Video files (each over an Hour in length), so patience is required.


IASSIST SIGDC Meeting Held in Vancouver

The IASSIST Special Interest Group on Data Citation (SIGDC) met in Vancouver on Wednesday, June 1, with 15 people in attendance. The group discussed ways in which IASSIST members could influence data citation standards and behavior. Suggestions were made to:

  • Inventory the resources that the SIG maintains and knows about
  • Create a set of simple slides to share with faculty and students; these might include guidelines on citation format with examples but would not endorse a certain format
  • Create posters on data citation to hang in prominent places
  • Contact bibliographic software companies to make sure they include data as a specific resource type
  • Contact style guides – APA, Chicago, MLA – to ensure that they are providing appropriate citations for data and including DOIs
  • Create a set of Web pages on this topic on the IASSIST site
  • Contact Google Scholar with a list of issues related to data

Joachim Wackerow presented information on ways to make DOIs more machine-actionable. He pointed out that CrossRef has a new project to provide for HTTP negotiation. This would permit the DOI to link to rich structured metadata like DDI in addition to a human-readable metadata record.

Updated Guide on Data Citation Available

Topic:

The Australian National Data Service has updated its Guide on Data Citation.

Data Citation Principles Workshop Held

Topic:

A workshop on Data Citation Principles sponsored by Harvard's Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences (IQSS) was held May 16-17 in Cambridge, MA. Presentations and other materials from the workshop are now available.

IASSIST 2011 conference song lyrics

Topic:

Sung to the tune of Bryan Adam's "Summer of '69" :

We all came to Vancouver
in spring 2-0-1-1
IASSISTers gather together
this is gonna be fun!

Day long Admin meeting
Ann skyped in for Constitutional change
and we kept it all to the schedule
Now that was really strange

oh, and when the Canucks won,
the cheering seemed to last forever
and that really set the scene
for the best IASSIST ever
These are the best days of IASISST

****

so many questions that you just can't answer
when metadata isn't standardized
in Japan/Europe/US and Australia
we're building apps to wrangle DDI

We love a plenary speaker
who gets there’s no one in the room who won’t
understand bias and stochastic error
‘cuz Canuck politicians sure don’t!

On the presidential 10K
Bill proved that he could run forever
As he takes up the reign
Down the Hill Bill, it’s now or never
Yours will be the best days of IASSIST

*****

On Thursday our data warrior
Chuck gave a plenary
on the Main Street of infrastructure
where will the social sciences be?

Lynda looks much taller on Twitter
she and others kept us in the know
“Moderately protected” is like “a little bit pregnant”
Tweeters were the star of the show

This boat actually left the pier
and the booze began to flow
San and her two Walters hit the floor
All the data people know that
these are the best days of IASSIST

******
And so it’s been decided
Next year we’ll be in DC
then in Cologne the year after
planned ahead for two out of three!

Next week when we look back
Vancouver seemed to last forever
And if we had the chance
we know we’d always want to be there
It was the best IASSIST of all

-------------------------------------------

Many thanks to our talented musical director (and past President) Melanie Wright, and everyone else who sang and listened; truly the best IASSIST conference song ever!

IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) volume 34-2 now on the web

The new issue of the IASSIST Quarterly is now available on the web. This is the volume 34 (number 2, 2010).

 http://iassistdata.org/iq/issue/34/2

The layout has changed. We hope you’ll enjoy the new style presented. It seems to be a more modern format and more suited for the PDF presentation on the web. Walter Piovesan – our publication officer – had a biking accident. To show that nothing is so bad that it is not good for something Walter used his recovery time to redesign the IQ. Furthermore, Walter is the person in charge of the upcoming 2011 IASSIST conference, so he is a busy guy. And I’m happy to say that Walter should be fit for the conference.

This issue of the IQ features the following papers:

Rein Murakas and Andu Rämmer from the Estonian Social Science Data Archive (ESSDA) at the University of Tartu describe in their paper "Social Science Data Archiving and Needs of the Public Sector: the Case of Estonia" how the archive had a historical background in the empirical research of the Soviet Union.

From the historical background we move to web 2.0 in a paper  by Angela Hariche, Estelle Loiseau and Philippa Lysaght on "Wikiprogress and Wikigender: a way forward for online collaboration". The authors are working at the OECD and the paper's statement is that "collaborative platforms such as wikis along with advances in data visualisation are a way forward for the collection, analysis and dissemination of data across countries and societies”.

The third paper addresses an issue of central importance for most data archives. The question concerns balancing data confidentiality and the legitimate requirements of data users. This is a key problem of the Secure Data Service (SDS) at the UK Data Archive, University of Essex. The paper "Secure Data Service: an improved access to disclosive data" by Reza Afkhami, Melanie Wright, and Mus Ahmet shows how the SDS will allow researchers remote access to secure servers at the UK Data Archive.

The last article has the title "A user-driven and flexible procedure for data linking". The authors are Cees van der Eijk and Eliyahu V. Sapir from the Methods and Data Institute at the University of Nottingham. The data linking relates to research combining several different datasets. The implementation is developed for the PIREDEU project in comparative electoral research. The authors are combining traditional survey data with data from party manifestos and state-level data.

Articles for the IQ are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST or other conferences, from local presentations or papers directly  written for the IQ.

Notice that chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants and will be readily available on the IASSIST website.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the description for layout and sending papers to the IQ:

http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr @ sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor or editors I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen, editor

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
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    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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