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A *really* secure data center

The May 21 issue of Boing Boing describes the InfoBunker, a "Cold War era government command bunker converted into a data center". I realize that they're not referring to the same kind of data center we mean, but it was kind of fun to read about a data center that has "a self-sufficient power systems (six days' worth of diesel fuel; 17,000 gallons of water (for drinking and fire suppression); military-grade NBC air filtration). It's built to withstand a 20-megaton nuclear blast at 2.5 miles, according to the website, and I can believe it. Your data will be intact even if the rest of the Internet has been vaporized."

Submitted by Walter Giesbrecht

Session D3: views from near a plug....

Your trusty blogger attended Data Access Questions:  Open and Shut (session D3).   She assumed that, as an august member of the blogging press, she would be afforded a primo seat.  But no, she again found herself sitting on the floor in the corner, next to another fake potted palm!  Thank heavens the session was moved to a neighboring room—larger and with a microphone. Obviously, a popular session on the challenges of working with data agreements from the perspectives of acquisition and user support. more...

IASSIST 2.0: Blog the conference! (Montreal, May 2007)

This is a starter blog entry for people to share their thoughts and reflections about the conference as we go along and afterwards. Just Add a comment to this post and blog away! If you would like to be a regular blog contributor, talk to San Cannon, the IASSIST Communique editor.

Technology befuddles session C3

So now that I remember my blog password, I have lots to say. I want to extend my congratulations and kudos to my fellow session participants in C3 (New Discovery Tools: Thinking Outside the Catalogue) where we managed to kill 3 laptops and still do 4 outstanding presentations.

Session A1: views from the floor

An overriding theme of the A1 session, Self-Archiving or Self Storage, was empowering data producers to participate in creating and providing metadata for their materials. Another way to describe it: involving researchers in these processes by meeting them where they’re at with the most flexible tools possible. I must also mention that this was an extremely popular session, drawing a standing-room-only crowd. So this roving blogger found a comfy seat in the back of the room on the floor, next to the fake potted palm. Hence, she was unable to see any of the visuals! more...

A Modest Set of Proposals

The conference is on and I'm hoping to see lots of blog entries from the interesting sessions today. I'm expecting some details on session A1 from another contributor but.... I've been asked by Kristin Partlo to pass along the proposals she and Rachael Barlow outlined at the end of their presentation for further comment. So here they are! This part of the session was on social bookmarking using sites such as del.icio.us and furl.

RIN Consultation paper on stewardship of research data

The RIN (Research Information Network) has recently published a draft consultation paper - Stewardship of digital research data: a framework of principles and guidelines (April 2007) and are seeking feedback from practitioners.

The draft discusses the shared framework of principles and guidelines required for key stakeholders (researchers, research institutions, funding bodies, libraries, data managers, learned societies and publishers) in order to maximise the potential benefits of digital research data and to help ensure that ‘ideas and knowledge derived from publicly-funded research should be made available and accessible for public use, interrogation, and scrutiny, as widely, rapidly and effectively as practicable.’

In addition to a collaborative approach the paper highlights the need to make explicit the roles and responsibilities of the key players in the research and research communications processes whilst remaining sensitive to: the needs of the researcher; the context in which the research is conducted; the requirements of different kinds of research data (words, numbers, pictures, sound); how the data were generated (purpose and process) and by whom.

RIN believes there are 5 principles reflecting the research data lifecycle which should be adopted by universities, colleges, research institutions and funding bodies, namely:

Roles and responsibilities – collaborative codes of practice

Standards and quality assurance – creation and collection in accordance with international standards

Access, usage and credit – easy to find and easy to use

Benefits and cost effectiveness – efficient data management and access

Preservation and sustainability – accessibility for current and future generations

To read the full draft paper visit: http://www.rin.ac.uk/data-principles. Please send any comments to Stephane Goldstein (Stephane.goldstein@rin.ac.uk) by 29 June 2007.

- Stuart Macdonald

Google has acquired Gapminder's Trendalyzer software

A world in motion, The official Google Blog, March 16, 2007, by Marissa Mayer
In this regard, we are excited to announce that we have acquired Gapminder's Trendalyzer software, and we welcome the Trendalyzer team to Google. Trendalyzer generates moving graphics and other novel effects in the display of facts, figures, and statistics in presentations.

European Data Portal (CESSDA)

The Council of European Social Science Data Archives (CESSDA) redesigned web site is now online at http://www.cessda.org. In addition to the new layout, the site has several new features including the CESSDA Data Portal which allows easy access to the catalogues of member organisations. Other pages provide a central news forum about CESSDA activities, links to official documents, contact details and other relevant information. more...

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...