Already a member?

Sign In

Conference Presentations 2006

  • IASSIST 2006-Data in a World of Networked Knowledge, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    Host Institution: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan School of Information Science, and the University of Michigan Library

Workshops (Tue, 2006-05-23)

  • W1: A Gentle Introduction to DDI: What's in it for Me?
    Jim Jacobs (University of California, San Diego)
    Wendy Thomas (University of Minnesota)

    [abstract]

    This workshop is Part 1 of a two-part workshop, with the second part offered in the afternoon as Workshop 5 (Hands-On DDI 3.0 - Concept, Structure, and Tools).

    DDI Version 3.0 is currently under review by the DDI Expert Committee and expected to move into public review following the DDI meeting during IASSIST. This long-anticipated move toward a modular approach based on the data life cycle brings increased coverage of comparative data, an instrumentation/questionnaire module, and data management provisions. The new version also raises questions as to what it means for current users of DDI 1 or 2 and what it means for data archivists and programmers. This two-part workshop will cover the broad questions of version differences, new 3.0 features, and the future of the DDI and data documentation (Part 1, Workshop 1, classroom format), and then address the practical aspects of migration to 3.0, metadata creation, and available tools (Part 2, Workshop 5, lab format). Attendees can register for the full-day workshop or either half-day session, depending on their needs and interests.

    Topics to be covered:

    • Conceptual differences between DDI and traditional documentation (including codebooks and DDI 1 and 2)
    • Utility, functionality, and uses of DDI (parse-ability, re-usability, flexibility, use over the life cycle of data, human-usable documentation, software-usable documentation, metadata as data, etc.), with many examples
    • Key features of DDI 3
    • DDI Lite
    • The future of DDI and data documentation

    Intended Audience: Anyone interested in DDI; no prior knowledge of DDI or XML is required. The morning workshop will present basic concepts of DDI.

    Presentation:
  • W2: Introduction to GIS
    Karl Longstreth (University of Michigan)

    [abstract]

    This hands-on workshop will involve familiarizing participants with GIS software and working with an actual dataset in one of the packages. More detailed information about the workshop will be forthcoming.

    Intended Audience: Individuals with little or no previous experience using GIS software.

  • W3: Introduction to Data Librarianship
    Paul Bern (Syracuse University)

    [abstract]

    This workshop will serve as an introduction to the processes and challenges of being a Data Librarian. Using real questions from real users, this hands-on workshop will go through the process of:

    1. Acquisition -- finding and obtaining data
    2. Archiving -- preserving and cataloging data for daily and long-term use
    3. Access -- providing the means for users to get the data
    4. Assistance -- helping users make sense of data and metadata in order to get the file or files in a format they can use

    Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences to share and explore with one another. No prior experience will be necessary to attend.

    Intended Audience: Individuals providing data services.

    Presentation:
  • W4: Building an SDA Archive
    Tom Piazza (University of California, Berkeley)
    Charlie Thomas (University of California, Berkeley)

    [abstract]

    This workshop will provide instruction to participants interested in building an SDA archive for online analysis. Many IASSIST members use SDA but find it difficult to set up an SDA archive and then to add new datasets to the archive.

    The workshop will cover the various steps that one needs to negotiate in implementing an SDA archive. It will also show archivists how to use some newly developed procedures that facilitate the addition of datasets to an SDA archive.

    Participants are encouraged to bring a data file (ASCII, fixed columns) and a matching DDI file to the workshop (on a diskette or a CD). They will be able to install that dataset on an SDA site for online analysis. Various other test files will be provided.

    The Web site with materials for the workshop can be found at: http://sda.berkeley.edu/workshop/iassist06

    Intended Audience: Individuals interested in creating an SDA archive.

    Presentation:
  • W5: Hands-On DDI 3.0 - Concept, Structure, and Tools
    Jim Jacobs (University of California, San Diego)
    Wendy Thomas (University of Minnesota)

    [abstract]

    This workshop is Part 2 of a two-part workshop, with the first part offered in the morning as Workshop 1 (A Gentle Introduction to DDI - What's in it for Me?).

    DDI Version 3.0 is currently under review by the DDI Expert Committee and expected to move into public review following the DDI meeting during IASSIST. This long-anticipated move toward a modular approach based on the data life cycle brings increased coverage of comparative data, an instrumentation/questionnaire module, and data management provisions. The new version also raises questions as to what it means for current users of DDI 1 or 2 and what it means for data archivists and programmers. This two-part workshop will cover the broad questions of version differences, new 3.0 features, and the future of the DDI and data documentation (Part 1, Workshop 1, classroom format), and then address the practical aspects of migration to 3.0, metadata creation, and available tools (Part 2, Workshop 5, lab format). Attendees can register for the full-day workshop or either half-day session, depending on their needs and interests.

    This will be a hands-on workshop in a computer lab. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own DDI files and documentation for lab work, but samples will be provided.

    Topics to be covered:

    • Quick overview of conceptual changes from DDI 1/2 to 3
    • Specifics of DDI 3: reusable classes, time, geography, comparative, instrument
    • Logical vs. physical structure of data
    • Migrating from DDI 2 to 3
    • Existing and planned tools and their functionality
    • Examples of use

    Intended Audience: Attendees of the morning session and those already familiar with DDI 1 or 2. The afternoon workshop will present more specific information about technical details of DDI 3.

  • W6: Statistical Literacy and Learning Objects
    Milo Schield (W.M. Keck Statistical Literacy Project)
    Cynthia Schield (W.M. Keck Statistical Literacy Project)

    [abstract]

    The 2002 Statistical Literacy Survey found that students, data analysts, and college instructors need help in forming ordinary English descriptions and comparisons of the rates and percentages presented in tables and graphs. The W.M. Keck Statistical Literacy Project developed a Web-based drill program that decodes students' descriptions and comparisons and gives users feedback on their errors. Students for whom English is not their native language may find this program very helpful. This statistical literacy learning object may be useful to students in the social sciences who need to be able to communicate statistical summaries involving rates and percentages. The goal of this workshop is to introduce users to the online program as a learning object. Those who complete this workshop should have the material they need to duplicate this workshop at their home institution.

    Intended Audience: Individuals interested in statistical literacy.

    Presentation:
  • W7: Using ATLAS.ti to Explore Archived Qualitative Data
    Libby Bishop (UK Data Archive, University of Essex)
    Louise Corti (UK Data Archive, University of Essex)

    [abstract]

    This workshop will present an overview of the uses and range of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) packages. Through hands-on sessions and exercises focusing on the software ATLAS.ti, participants will be introduced to the particular applications and key functions of the software. Archived qualitative data from ESDS Qualidata will be used as the data sources. The session is intended to be practical and intensive and aims to get participants started with the software by familiarizing them with the following:

    • Initial usage tools
    • Data preparation considerations
    • Importing data into software
    • "Coding" of data (attaching thematic labels to segments of data)
    • Search and retrieval of coded data
    • Use of annotation and memoing tools
    • Exporting data

    Intended Audience: Individuals interested in learning about qualitative data analysis software. The workshop assumes little or no experience with Atlas-ti or other qualitative software packages.

    Presentation:

Plenary I (Wed, 2006-05-24)
Moderator: Myron Gutmann

  • Cyberinfrastructure and the Social Sciences
    Bjorn Henrichsen (Norwegian Social Science Data Services)
    Presentation:

A1: Leading Users to Knowledge: Data Librarians to the Rescue (Wed, 2006-05-24)
Chair:Stuart Macdonald, University of Edinburgh

  • Keeping Current in Social Science Data (Without Paddling Upstream)
    Joanne Juhnke (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    [abstract]

    Keeping current with the field of social science data, in a world of networked knowledge, is no trivial undertaking. On the one hand, the proliferation of information can challenge even seasoned professionals, while presenting a daunting array of possibilities to a newcomer in the field. On the other hand, the latest news and information about data can sometimes be quite well-hidden. This presentation will examine sources and strategies for balancing the flow of data-news while keeping abreast of news and developments in the field. A companion Web site will be available at the Data & Program Library Service (DPLS), UW-Madison.

    Presentation:
  • Education on the Fly for the Accidental Library Data Professional: Design Your Professional Publication
    Michele Hayslett (North Carolina State University Libraries)

    [abstract]

    Interest has been expressed in a professional publication addressing the needs of data professionals working in libraries. Within the context of libraries, issues common to many types of data professionals take on special significance -- collection management, metadata developments, tools targeting specific academic user groups, preservation, and so on. Is there sufficient interest among data professionals in libraries to support a stand-alone publication or development of regular features in a pre-existing one? What topics are potential readers interested in? What formats are preferred? This session will be a facilitated discussion, beginning with presentation of initial survey results and alternative publication models, to exchange information about the needs of the group and devise a publication with the broadest utility.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...