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Conference Presentations 2010

  • IASSIST 2010-Social Data and Social Networking: Connecting Social Science Communities across the Globe, Ithaca, NY
    Host Institution: Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) and Cornell University Library (CUL)

A1: Developing a Longitudinal Data Archive: Lessons Throughout the Data Lifecycle (Wed, 2010-06-02)
Chair:Jack Kneeshaw, UK Data Archive/ESDS

  • Direct Visualization of Longitudinal Data
    Kevin Pulo (Australian National University)

    [abstract]

    This session examines best practice standards associated with managing and archiving longitudinal data. The data structure of longitudinal studies is more complex than for one-dimensional study designs and therefore new issues typically arise with the process of data management, archiving and analysis. There are a number of different types of longitudinal studies now in existence, including but not limited to: - panel surveys following a cohort of individuals - panel surveys following a random population sample of individuals over a period of time - repeated cross-sectional surveys with a different cross-section of individuals sampled at each time point. Five major longitudinal panel studies are currently archived at the Australian Social Science Data Archive, and there is increasing demand to archive data from regional and national longitudinal surveys, as well as repeated cross-sectional data such as Australian election campaigns. The presentations in this session will examine archiving practices associated with the different stages of longitudinal data archiving, including: - Archiving cross-sectional time series data (Leanne den Hartog) - Archiving longitudinal panel data (Steven McEachern) - Visualisation of longitudinal panel data (Kevin Pulo)

    Presentation:
  • Meta Data Standards for Managing and Archiving Longitudinal Data: Achieving Best Practice
    Steven McEachern (Australian National University)
    Melanie Spallek (University of Queensland)
    Michele Haynes (University of Queensland)
    Mark Western (University of Queensland)

    [abstract]

    This session examines best practice standards associated with managing and archiving longitudinal data. The data structure of longitudinal studies is more complex than for one-dimensional study designs and therefore new issues typically arise with the process of data management, archiving and analysis. There are a number of different types of longitudinal studies now in existence, including but not limited to: - panel surveys following a cohort of individuals - panel surveys following a random population sample of individuals over a period of time - repeated cross-sectional surveys with a different cross-section of individuals sampled at each time point. Five major longitudinal panel studies are currently archived at the Australian Social Science Data Archive, and there is increasing demand to archive data from regional and national longitudinal surveys, as well as repeated cross-sectional data such as Australian election campaigns. The presentations in this session will examine archiving practices associated with the different stages of longitudinal data archiving, including: - Archiving cross-sectional time series data (Leanne den Hartog) - Archiving longitudinal panel data (Steven McEachern) - Visualisation of longitudinal panel data (Kevin Pulo)

  • Archiving cross-sectional Time Series Data: Data is Only Half the Story
    Leanne den Hartog (University of Western Australia)

    [abstract]

    This session examines best practice standards associated with managing and archiving longitudinal data. The data structure of longitudinal studies is more complex than for one-dimensional study designs and therefore new issues typically arise with the process of data management, archiving and analysis. There are a number of different types of longitudinal studies now in existence, including but not limited to: - panel surveys following a cohort of individuals - panel surveys following a random population sample of individuals over a period of time - repeated cross-sectional surveys with a different cross-section of individuals sampled at each time point. Five major longitudinal panel studies are currently archived at the Australian Social Science Data Archive, and there is increasing demand to archive data from regional and national longitudinal surveys, as well as repeated cross-sectional data such as Australian election campaigns. The presentations in this session will examine archiving practices associated with the different stages of longitudinal data archiving, including: - Archiving cross-sectional time series data (Leanne den Hartog) - Archiving longitudinal panel data (Steven McEachern) - Visualisation of longitudinal panel data (Kevin Pulo)

    Presentation:

A2: Downstream Curation: Researchers and Data Management (Wed, 2010-06-02)
Chair:Katherine McNeill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Learning by Doing: Cases of Librarians Working with Faculty Research Data for the First Time
    Jake Carlson (Purdue University Libraries)
    Michael Witt (Purdue University Libraries)

    [abstract]

    With few precedents to follow, libraries and librarians who are beginning to explore their potential roles in data curation are grappling to relate their training and experience as librarians to the development and stewardship of data collections. In 2008, a group of librarians at Purdue University conducted an exercise to learn more about what data curation might mean to them in practical terms by identifying and engaging potential data contributors on campus. Subject-specialist librarians engaged six data creators from different disciplines, each in their own way, to solicit contributions from them. The librarians were asked to report back with a collection-level description of the dataset, their rationale for its selection, and a narrative of how they engaged and interacted with the data creator to answer questions such as, “How should the dataset be presented in the repository?” and “What policies are needed for its submission, use, and preservation?” The datasets were then ingested into a prototype data repository. This session will present the structure of the exercise along with vignettes to illustrate the challenges, issues, and insights of the librarians from their perspectives.

    Presentation:
  • Socialization of the Institutional Repository: IR Plus
    Suzanne Bell (University of Rochester)
    Nathan Sarr (University of Rochester Libraries)

    [abstract]

    IR Plus is a new, open source platform for institutional repositories. Based on several years of user research, IR Plus was written to support faculty and grad students in the creation phases of their research, rather than just being a receptacle for finished work. For social scientists, the format-agnostic personal workspace supports storing and sharing large datasets, allowing them to collaborate with colleagues all over the world. When the work is ready for "publication" into the repository, a controlled but flexible approach to metadata allows easy addition of new types while keeping the overall metadata clean. Bringing the repository closer to social networking systems, users of the system can showcase and provide access to their work through Researcher Pages, which are easy to create and maintain. Users can now also feature "personal publications" on their Researcher Pages: material from the workspace that has not been added to any of the collections in the repository. While IR Plus was not created just for data users, we feel IASSIST members will find a number of its features interesting and useful, and it provides a study of a formal, institutional system edging into the world of social networking and collaboration.

    Presentation:
  • Information Behaviour of Life Science Researchers – Informing Funders and Service Providers
    Stuart Macdonald (EDINA National Data Centre, University of Edinburgh)

    [abstract]

    This paper will discuss the findings of the RIN-funded Case Studies in Life Sciences project, undertaken by a team of social scientists and information specialists from the Institute for the Study of Science, Technology and Innovation (ISSTI) and from Information Services and the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) at the University of Edinburgh. The aim of the project was to improve understanding of information use in the life sciences, and to provide a broader and deeper base of evidence to inform discussions about how information policy and practice can most effectively be supported and improved. Case studies were conducted across laboratories and research groups from 7 sub-disciplines of the life sciences and deployed a range of methodologies and tools including short-term ethnographic techniques and semi-structured instruments. Our key conclusion indicates that policies and strategies of research funders and information service providers must be informed by an understanding of the constraints and practices of different research communities. Only thus will they be effective in optimising use and exchange of information, and in ensuring that they are scientifically productive and cost-effective The full report ‘Patterns of information use and exchange: case studies of researchers in the life sciences’ is available at: http://www.rin.ac.uk/case-studies.

    Presentation:

A3: New Directions in Inter-Archival Collaboration from the Data Preservation Alliance for the Social Sciences (Data-PASS) (Wed, 2010-06-02)
Moderator: Amy Pienta, ICPSR

  • How collaborative preservation works
    Micah Altman (Harvard University)

    [abstract]

    The Data-PASS partnership engages in collaboration at three levels: coordinated operations, development of best practices, and creation and use of open-source shared infrastructure. The first talk in the session provides an update on our search for replication and distributed storage technologies for preservation. Systems like iRODS and LOCKSS can be developed into preservation environments for social science data archives. The key when implementing these preservation environments will be the modification of existing archive policies and procedures to reflect new dependence on collaboration. The second talk discusses the collection of international public opinion data collected by the USIA, which began in 1952 and extended through 1999. Until recently, these data were difficult to access. The Roper Center and the National Archives and Records Administration have identified, rescued, and made these data available to the research community. The third talk describes a new alliance between ICPSR and Institutional Repositories (IRs) with the goal of preserving and re-using social science data. This talk focuses on the formation of these partnerships; how an archiving guide for IRs will be developed; and new services that ICPSR can offer to IRs to assist with social science data. The fourth talk summarizes the efforts of ICPSR and the Roper Center to migrate punched card data to modern preservation formats. This presentation focuses on the recovery of the Cornell Retirement Study, a longitudinal study that began in 1952. The final talk discusses the current collaborative structure of Data-PASS, our agreements, infrastructure, and the services and infrastructure available to new partners.

    Presentation:
  • Retirement in the 1950s: Recovering The Cornell Study of Occupational Retirement
    Amy Pienta (ICPSR)

    [abstract]

    The Data-PASS partnership engages in collaboration at three levels: coordinated operations, development of best practices, and creation and use of open-source shared infrastructure. The first talk in the session provides an update on our search for replication and distributed storage technologies for preservation. Systems like iRODS and LOCKSS can be developed into preservation environments for social science data archives. The key when implementing these preservation environments will be the modification of existing archive policies and procedures to reflect new dependence on collaboration. The second talk discusses the collection of international public opinion data collected by the USIA, which began in 1952 and extended through 1999. Until recently, these data were difficult to access. The Roper Center and the National Archives and Records Administration have identified, rescued, and made these data available to the research community. The third talk describes a new alliance between ICPSR and Institutional Repositories (IRs) with the goal of preserving and re-using social science data. This talk focuses on the formation of these partnerships; how an archiving guide for IRs will be developed; and new services that ICPSR can offer to IRs to assist with social science data. The fourth talk summarizes the efforts of ICPSR and the Roper Center to migrate punched card data to modern preservation formats. This presentation focuses on the recovery of the Cornell Retirement Study, a longitudinal study that began in 1952. The final talk discusses the current collaborative structure of Data-PASS, our agreements, infrastructure, and the services and infrastructure available to new partners.

    Presentation:
  • Building Partnerships Between Social Science Data Archives and Institutional Repositories
    Jared Lyle (ICPSR)

    [abstract]

    The Data-PASS partnership engages in collaboration at three levels: coordinated operations, development of best practices, and creation and use of open-source shared infrastructure. The first talk in the session provides an update on our search for replication and distributed storage technologies for preservation. Systems like iRODS and LOCKSS can be developed into preservation environments for social science data archives. The key when implementing these preservation environments will be the modification of existing archive policies and procedures to reflect new dependence on collaboration. The second talk discusses the collection of international public opinion data collected by the USIA, which began in 1952 and extended through 1999. Until recently, these data were difficult to access. The Roper Center and the National Archives and Records Administration have identified, rescued, and made these data available to the research community. The third talk describes a new alliance between ICPSR and Institutional Repositories (IRs) with the goal of preserving and re-using social science data. This talk focuses on the formation of these partnerships; how an archiving guide for IRs will be developed; and new services that ICPSR can offer to IRs to assist with social science data. The fourth talk summarizes the efforts of ICPSR and the Roper Center to migrate punched card data to modern preservation formats. This presentation focuses on the recovery of the Cornell Retirement Study, a longitudinal study that began in 1952. The final talk discusses the current collaborative structure of Data-PASS, our agreements, infrastructure, and the services and infrastructure available to new partners.

    Presentation:
  • USIA Office of Research Surveys, 1952-99NARA –Roper Center Collaboration: An Update
    Lois Timms-Ferrara (The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research)

    [abstract]

    The Data-PASS partnership engages in collaboration at three levels: coordinated operations, development of best practices, and creation and use of open-source shared infrastructure. The first talk in the session provides an update on our search for replication and distributed storage technologies for preservation. Systems like iRODS and LOCKSS can be developed into preservation environments for social science data archives. The key when implementing these preservation environments will be the modification of existing archive policies and procedures to reflect new dependence on collaboration. The second talk discusses the collection of international public opinion data collected by the USIA, which began in 1952 and extended through 1999. Until recently, these data were difficult to access. The Roper Center and the National Archives and Records Administration have identified, rescued, and made these data available to the research community. The third talk describes a new alliance between ICPSR and Institutional Repositories (IRs) with the goal of preserving and re-using social science data. This talk focuses on the formation of these partnerships; how an archiving guide for IRs will be developed; and new services that ICPSR can offer to IRs to assist with social science data. The fourth talk summarizes the efforts of ICPSR and the Roper Center to migrate punched card data to modern preservation formats. This presentation focuses on the recovery of the Cornell Retirement Study, a longitudinal study that began in 1952. The final talk discusses the current collaborative structure of Data-PASS, our agreements, infrastructure, and the services and infrastructure available to new partners.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...