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Conference Presentations 2010

  • IASSIST 2010-Social Data and Social Networking: Connecting Social Science Communities across the Globe, Ithaca, NY
    Host Institution: Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) and Cornell University Library (CUL)

E1: Engaging New Users (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Chair:Lynda Kellam, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

  • Developing an Internet based Data Service at SSJDA in Japa
    Keiichi Sato (University of Tokyo , Institute of Social Science)

    [abstract]

    The Social Science Japan Data Archive (SSJDA) collects, maintains, and provides access to the academic community, a vast archive of social science data (quantitative data obtained from social surveys) for secondary analyses. As a unit within the Center for Social Research and Data Archives, Institute of Social Science, University of Tokyo, SSJDA aims to promote empirical research on Japan in the social sciences, and has been disseminating survey data since April, 1998. The total number of available datasets is about 1,200 in the end of 2008. SSJDA plays the role of a major data provider for those who seek to analyze the Japanese society using micro data. This presentation discusses the recent efforts in developing the internet based system at SSJDA. SSJDA has an on-line searching system powered by full-text search engine. It has also developed an on-line data provision system which started to operate from April 2009. The English version of the same system will be made public early in 2010. In addition, SSJDA has just started to consider the adoption of DDI seriously.

    Presentation:

E2: Connecting the IASSIST Community Across the Web: IASSIST Publications Committee and e-Community Infrastructure Action Group Discussion with Members (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Moderator: Robin Rice, University of Edinburgh

  • Connecting the IASSIST Community Across the Web: IASSIST Publications Committee and e-Community Infrastructure Action Group Discussion with Members
    Walter Piovesan (University of Vancouver)
    Bo Wandschneider (University of Guelph)
    Harrison Dekker (University of California Berkeley)
    Carol Perry (University of Guelph)
    Amy West (University of Minnesota)
    Jennifer Darragh (Johns Hopkins University )

    [abstract]

    The IASSIST website was created by a lone volunteer in 1999 and through a massive volunteer effort by an expanded Pubs committee was formed into the present site in 2002. Calls for modernization were heard in the conference hallways at least two years ago, and a migration to an open source web content management system was envisaged. Following some ups and downs and many skype conference calls during 2009/10, a new ‘swat team’ emerged to build a new website to allow greater participation and interaction by members, along with a brand new look and feel. Meanwhile, the e-Community Infrastructure Action Group was formed in 2009, charged with proposing an umbrella of infrastructure for the IASSIST e-Community. IASSIST has long used virtual means to build its community. Mail lists, websites, blogs, online databases, virtual workspaces, and social networking are now a day-to-day part of the operation of the association. Clearly, new technologies afford us the possibility for synergy among our multifarious online presences in a way that can enrich our community and ease its administration. In the tradition of the Outreach and Strategy committees: we would like to share our work over the last year and open the floor for discussion.

E3: Panel: Confidentiality and Access Concerns of the Social Sciences and Human Subjects Ethics Review Boards (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Moderator: Libbie Stephenson, Social Science Data Archive, University of California, Los Angeles

  • Ethics Review in Finland
    Arja Kuula (Finnish Social Science Data Archive)

    [abstract]

    In the United States and elsewhere, the need for ethics review was addressed in response to egregious ethical violations in medical and biological research. Research review in the social and behavioral sciences has slowly evolved from this medical background, but several contentious issues remain in the effort to best address the needs and risks of social science data collection, analysis, and archival. This panel will be structured to bring together various stakeholders in the ongoing worldwide discussion of ethics review in the social sciences to discuss current needs and future directions in the United States and elsewhere. This session will be structured as a panel discussion and not as a series of presentations. Each panelist will be given a chance at the beginning to describe his or her viewpoints regarding the current state of regulation, data access and confidentiality in social science research. However, a moderated discussion centered around issues of data accessibility, confidentiality, regulatory development, and the roles of data archives, to name a few, will comprise the bulk of the session.

    The first panelist, Arja Kuula, will describe the standpoints and the scope of the Finnish ethics review system, which differs from the U.S. system. One of the goals of the Finnish system is to find a balance between confidentiality and the openness of science and research. In addition to informing about the ethical norms that relate to data archiving, Arja will tell how the Finnish Social Science Data Archive has been involved in making guidelines for ethics review at the University of Tampere.

    The second panelist, Robert Downs, will present on the perspective that the IRB takes on data management when reviewing research protocols for the protection of human subjects and discuss ways in which these issues can be addressed. He will also discuss some challenges that the protection of human subjects presents to researchers and archives for the collection, management, and dissemination of data.

    The third panelist, Yasamin Miller, will speak on the current state of ethics review and how it should and will change in the future. Yasamin will also provide perspectives, concerns, ideas, etc. from the human subjects review board/IRB side of the table.

    Presentation:
  • Scientific Data Management for the Protection of Human Subjects
    Robert Downs (Columbia University)

    [abstract]

    In the United States and elsewhere, the need for ethics review was addressed in response to egregious ethical violations in medical and biological research. Research review in the social and behavioral sciences has slowly evolved from this medical background, but several contentious issues remain in the effort to best address the needs and risks of social science data collection, analysis, and archival. This panel will be structured to bring together various stakeholders in the ongoing worldwide discussion of ethics review in the social sciences to discuss current needs and future directions in the United States and elsewhere. This session will be structured as a panel discussion and not as a series of presentations. Each panelist will be given a chance at the beginning to describe his or her viewpoints regarding the current state of regulation, data access and confidentiality in social science research. However, a moderated discussion centered around issues of data accessibility, confidentiality, regulatory development, and the roles of data archives, to name a few, will comprise the bulk of the session.

    The first panelist, Arja Kuula, will describe the standpoints and the scope of the Finnish ethics review system, which differs from the U.S. system. One of the goals of the Finnish system is to find a balance between confidentiality and the openness of science and research. In addition to informing about the ethical norms that relate to data archiving, Arja will tell how the Finnish Social Science Data Archive has been involved in making guidelines for ethics review at the University of Tampere.

    The second panelist, Robert Downs, will present on the perspective that the IRB takes on data management when reviewing research protocols for the protection of human subjects and discuss ways in which these issues can be addressed. He will also discuss some challenges that the protection of human subjects presents to researchers and archives for the collection, management, and dissemination of data.

    The third panelist, Yasamin Miller, will speak on the current state of ethics review and how it should and will change in the future. Yasamin will also provide perspectives, concerns, ideas, etc. from the human subjects review board/IRB side of the table.

    Presentation:

E4: Secure Remote Access to Restricted Data (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Chair:Jon Stiles, University of California, Berkeley

  • Secure Data Service; an Improved Access to Disclosive Data
    Reza Afkhami (UK Data Archive)
    Melanie Wright (UK Data Archive)

    [abstract]

    The UKDA Secure Data Service is a new service to allow controlled restricted access procedures for making more detailed microdata files available to some users (Approved Researchers), subject to conditions of eligibility, purpose of use, security procedures, and other features associated with access to the SDS data. Its operation is legally framed by the 2007 statistics Act. A key problem in Secure Data Service (SDS) data confidentiality is to balance the legitimate requirements of data users and confidentiality protection. Employing security technologies used by the military and banking sectors, the SDS will allow trained researchers to remotely access data which is held securely on central SDS servers at the UK Data Archive. The aim of the service is to provide approved academics unprecedented access to valuable data for research from their home institutions, with all of the necessary safeguards to ensure that data is held, accessed and handled securely. The SDS follows a model which suggests that the safe use of data should cover the elements of safe project, safe people, safe setting and safe output. In order to achieve the above goal, data security depends on a matrix of factors, including technical, legal, contractual, and educational.

    Presentation:
  • The 2006 French Census: A New Collection, A New Dissemination. Which Place for a Data Archive?
    Alexandre Kych (Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CMH))

    [abstract]

    The 1999 census was the last exhaustive census in France that has moved towards a continuous population census since 2006. At that time, the French national statistical office (INSEE) renewed profoundly his website and propose today several collections of aggregated tables, at municipality level, and more than 10 different microdata files. Anybody can now download these tables and files without any commitment and free of charge. Yet the on-line microdata files are not complete due to confidentiality protection requirements and the standard aggregated tables cannot answer all the questions. The presentation will focus on the evolution of the specific role of the French Data Archives in this new context. The Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CMH), who is in charge within Réseau Quetelet to provide access to government micro data for the researchers, offers in cooperation with INSEE specific ways for tabulations on request. It also provides the annual census survey micro data file. The new remote access built by INSEE in cooperation with the Data Archives will offer other possibilities. Finally, not surprisingly, researchers also continue to turn to CMH for getting help and advice.

    Presentation:

Social Networking / User Needs (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Chair:Tom Lindsay

  • Imagining the Possibilities of Collaborative Spatial Learning: OCUL’s Geospatial Portal Project and Its Inspirations
    Leanne Hindmarch (Ontario Council of University)
    Jenny Marvin (University of Guelph)

    [abstract]

    OCUL’s Geospatial and Health Informatics Cyberinfrastructure Portal (“Geospatial Portal” for short) is a new project to create a data storage and discovery tool in Ontario, Canada, intended to improve access to geospatial and health data for Ontario researchers and students. One of the priorities of the project is to explore how new, collaborative, web-based technologies have influenced teaching and learning of spatial concepts and dissemination and use of spatial data. We then intend to incorporate these tools into the Geospatial Portal, thus encouraging its integration into fundamental classroom and research processes. In this presentation, we will provide an engaging and fun look at the latest online technologies for sharing, creating, and working with spatial data, with visual examples of projects featuring mashups, collaboration tools, and community-contributed data. We’ll offer a first look at our plans to use such technologies in the Geospatial Portal, to encourage engagement with spatial data literacy among the Ontario academic community.

  • Do Users Know What They Really Really Want?
    Jackie Carter (University of Manchester )
    Richard Wiseman (University of Manchester )

    [abstract]

    The Census Dissemination Unit at the UK national data centre based at the University of Manchester has been delivering Census Aggregate Statistics over the web to academics for over 10 years. The tool used to deliver it - Casweb - was once-upon-a-time innovative. Unfortunately this is no longer the case. The tool 'does the job' but users (say they) are looking for more interactivity, improved ease of use, and better ways to combine data. Achieving this is not easy given a small team whose remit is to support tens of thousands of users, as well as keeping up with changing user expectations and undertaking in-house development. And all this when the data delivery methods are changing too. Still, never ones to turn down a challenge, the team at Manchester has undertaken to update the data access system in-line with user requirements. A separate paper discusses the underpinning technology (the InFuse project based on SDMX and a data feed approach). This paper/presentation shows how we are engaging directly with users - both face to face and using social software - to get them to tell us what they really really want.

    Presentation:
  • Toy Story: Social Networking in Dataland
    Lynda Kellam (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)
    Amy West (University of Minnesota)
    Katharin Peter (University of North Carolina)

    [abstract]

    Social Networking ranges from the sublime to the del.icio.us. Effective social networking tools fit into one's work styles, further one's goals and support a playful approach to one's work. Join us as we share and skewer our favorite social networking toys for bookmarking, microblogging, promoting data services, promoting ourselves and keeping up to date on the data world. We will also look at how some of our favorite data producers are using and misusing social networking and web 2.0 tools.

    Presentation:
  • Using Ethnography in the Library: How to Study the Students in their Native Data-Gathering Habits
    Lois Stickell (University of North Carolina at Charlotte )

    [abstract]

    Most libraries have access to myriad information sources and data of all types. The librarians know how to access the data but do the students? While webpage redesigns and other attempts to make user information more helpful often focus on usability studies, there is little research on how students make initial choices about where to go for data. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte has embarked on a ethnographically-based study of student use of the library that includes hiring an Anthropologist to facilitate helping librarians better understand student behavior. This study is in the early stages but is patterned after study at the University of Rochester. M presentation will focus on how the library plans to incorporate this study and the changes it suggests into an overall re-design of library websites and the physical facility itself with the goal of better serving the students. While the overall study will be broad, my presentaiton will focus on how the lbirary plans to focus on how students seek/find data and how they succeed and/or fail at the process.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...