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Conference Presentations 2010

  • IASSIST 2010-Social Data and Social Networking: Connecting Social Science Communities across the Globe, Ithaca, NY
    Host Institution: Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) and Cornell University Library (CUL)

Social Networking / User Needs (Thu, 2010-06-03)
Chair:Tom Lindsay

  • Visualizing [a new] Data Service
    Shawn Nicholson (Michigan State University)
    Terrence Bennett (The College of New Jersey)

    [abstract]

    Infrastructure for data collection, access, analysis and preservation; new data partnerships in knowledge communities; and some explication of roles and responsibilities--a slide is worth a thousand words. This Pecha Kucha explores institutional readiness preparatory to the possible establishment of a new data services center at a research university in Singapore.

  • Effective Researcher Management
    Tanvi Desai (London School of Economics )
    Felix Ritchie (Office for National Statistics)

    [abstract]

    The traditional approach to data security has been a 'data management' approach where the data provider takes full responsility for data security delivering a 'safe' anonymised file to the users who tend to be viewed as a risk. This paper will argue that a 'researcher management' approach where researchers are trained to understand data security and disclosure control, and are encouraged to work cooperatively with data providers has many benefits that a 'data management' approach cannot deliver.

    Presentation:

F1: Data Reference in Depth (Part I): Subjects, Sources and Challenges (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Chair:Bobray Bordelon, Princeton University

  • Data Reference in DepthTrade, Prices, Production, Consumption
    Amy West (University of Minnesota)

    [abstract]

    Data services librarians are expected to be fluent in a range of sources dependent on the needs of their patrons. The data librarian needs to be prepared to move easily between often diverse subject areas. The presenters in this session will give participants a sampling of a data librarian's "day in the life" by highlighting a few major subject areas and their primary data sources. Participants will get a head start on dealing with some particular reference challenges by getting an introduction to some key sources and particular challenges that crop up in a sampling of different areas. First, Amy West will lead us through the world of International Trade, Commodities, Prices and Production. Next Lynda Kellam will move to the U.S. with a focus on the major changes to occur with the U.S. 2010 Census and American Community Survey. Walter Giesbrecht will cover labor with a look at both national and international sources as well as the problems of harmonization. The developing world will be the focus of Kristi Thompson's talk as she looks at survey data on International Development. Her focus will be on survey data on developing countries. She will look at some of the different groups that conduct surveys and make the microdata available: national, intergovernmental organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and nongovermnetal organization sources such as the Demographic and Health Surveys. She will compare the major sources on topics covered, samples, geographic and temporal coverage, and access issues. Mary Tao will finish off with a timely look at data on the credit crisis. She will discuss where to start when a researcher asks for data/statistical information on mortgages, credit cards, financial institutions, and other financial crisis-related materials. Both fee-based and free resources will be covered in this presentation.

    Presentation:
  • Data in Development
    Kristi Thompson (University of Windsor)

    [abstract]

    Data services librarians are expected to be fluent in a range of sources dependent on the needs of their patrons. The data librarian needs to be prepared to move easily between often diverse subject areas. The presenters in this session will give participants a sampling of a data librarian's "day in the life" by highlighting a few major subject areas and their primary data sources. Participants will get a head start on dealing with some particular reference challenges by getting an introduction to some key sources and particular challenges that crop up in a sampling of different areas. First, Amy West will lead us through the world of International Trade, Commodities, Prices and Production. Next Lynda Kellam will move to the U.S. with a focus on the major changes to occur with the U.S. 2010 Census and American Community Survey. Walter Giesbrecht will cover labor with a look at both national and international sources as well as the problems of harmonization. The developing world will be the focus of Kristi Thompson's talk as she looks at survey data on International Development. Her focus will be on survey data on developing countries. She will look at some of the different groups that conduct surveys and make the microdata available: national, intergovernmental organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and nongovermnetal organization sources such as the Demographic and Health Surveys. She will compare the major sources on topics covered, samples, geographic and temporal coverage, and access issues. Mary Tao will finish off with a timely look at data on the credit crisis. She will discuss where to start when a researcher asks for data/statistical information on mortgages, credit cards, financial institutions, and other financial crisis-related materials. Both fee-based and free resources will be covered in this presentation.

    Presentation:
  • How the 3 Little Pigs Lost their Houses to subprime Mortgages and Other Big Bad Wolves
    Mary Tao (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

    [abstract]

    Data services librarians are expected to be fluent in a range of sources dependent on the needs of their patrons. The data librarian needs to be prepared to move easily between often diverse subject areas. The presenters in this session will give participants a sampling of a data librarian's "day in the life" by highlighting a few major subject areas and their primary data sources. Participants will get a head start on dealing with some particular reference challenges by getting an introduction to some key sources and particular challenges that crop up in a sampling of different areas. First, Amy West will lead us through the world of International Trade, Commodities, Prices and Production. Next Lynda Kellam will move to the U.S. with a focus on the major changes to occur with the U.S. 2010 Census and American Community Survey. Walter Giesbrecht will cover labor with a look at both national and international sources as well as the problems of harmonization. The developing world will be the focus of Kristi Thompson's talk as she looks at survey data on International Development. Her focus will be on survey data on developing countries. She will look at some of the different groups that conduct surveys and make the microdata available: national, intergovernmental organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and nongovermnetal organization sources such as the Demographic and Health Surveys. She will compare the major sources on topics covered, samples, geographic and temporal coverage, and access issues. Mary Tao will finish off with a timely look at data on the credit crisis. She will discuss where to start when a researcher asks for data/statistical information on mortgages, credit cards, financial institutions, and other financial crisis-related materials. Both fee-based and free resources will be covered in this presentation.

    Presentation:
  • Census 2010 & the American Community Survey
    Lynda Kellam (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

    [abstract]

    Data services librarians are expected to be fluent in a range of sources dependent on the needs of their patrons. The data librarian needs to be prepared to move easily between often diverse subject areas. The presenters in this session will give participants a sampling of a data librarian's "day in the life" by highlighting a few major subject areas and their primary data sources. Participants will get a head start on dealing with some particular reference challenges by getting an introduction to some key sources and particular challenges that crop up in a sampling of different areas. First, Amy West will lead us through the world of International Trade, Commodities, Prices and Production. Next Lynda Kellam will move to the U.S. with a focus on the major changes to occur with the U.S. 2010 Census and American Community Survey. Walter Giesbrecht will cover labor with a look at both national and international sources as well as the problems of harmonization. The developing world will be the focus of Kristi Thompson's talk as she looks at survey data on International Development. Her focus will be on survey data on developing countries. She will look at some of the different groups that conduct surveys and make the microdata available: national, intergovernmental organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and nongovermnetal organization sources such as the Demographic and Health Surveys. She will compare the major sources on topics covered, samples, geographic and temporal coverage, and access issues. Mary Tao will finish off with a timely look at data on the credit crisis. She will discuss where to start when a researcher asks for data/statistical information on mortgages, credit cards, financial institutions, and other financial crisis-related materials. Both fee-based and free resources will be covered in this presentation.

    Presentation:
  • Data Reference in Depth: Sources of International Labour Data
    Walter Giesbrecht (York University)

    [abstract]

    Data services librarians are expected to be fluent in a range of sources dependent on the needs of their patrons. The data librarian needs to be prepared to move easily between often diverse subject areas. The presenters in this session will give participants a sampling of a data librarian's "day in the life" by highlighting a few major subject areas and their primary data sources. Participants will get a head start on dealing with some particular reference challenges by getting an introduction to some key sources and particular challenges that crop up in a sampling of different areas. First, Amy West will lead us through the world of International Trade, Commodities, Prices and Production. Next Lynda Kellam will move to the U.S. with a focus on the major changes to occur with the U.S. 2010 Census and American Community Survey. Walter Giesbrecht will cover labor with a look at both national and international sources as well as the problems of harmonization. The developing world will be the focus of Kristi Thompson's talk as she looks at survey data on International Development. Her focus will be on survey data on developing countries. She will look at some of the different groups that conduct surveys and make the microdata available: national, intergovernmental organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and nongovermnetal organization sources such as the Demographic and Health Surveys. She will compare the major sources on topics covered, samples, geographic and temporal coverage, and access issues. Mary Tao will finish off with a timely look at data on the credit crisis. She will discuss where to start when a researcher asks for data/statistical information on mortgages, credit cards, financial institutions, and other financial crisis-related materials. Both fee-based and free resources will be covered in this presentation.

    Presentation:

F2: Data Management: Engaging Researchers and Crossing Disciplines (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Chair:Katherine McNeill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology LibrariesModerator: Gail Steinhart, Cornell University

  • Data management: engaging researchers and crossing disciplines
    Veerle Van den Eynden (UK Data Archive)

    [abstract]

    Data management is a growing area of service for data archives and university libraries alike. How do data professionals support researchers in their efforts to manage, disseminate, and preserve their research data? What are the roles of librarians and data archivists? This group of presenters will detail how they and their colleagues have been enabling this work at their institution through a variety of activities such as: identifying the needs of researchers, engaging researchers further upstream in the data life cycle, working with researchers and colleagues across disciplines, involving librarians, conducting trainings, developing learning materials and guidelines, and facilitating the implementation of data management plans.

    Presentation:
  • Services, Policy, Guidance and Training: Improving Research Data Management at One Institution
    Robin Rice (Edinburgh University)

    [abstract]

    Data management is a growing area of service for data archives and university libraries alike. How do data professionals support researchers in their efforts to manage, disseminate, and preserve their research data? What are the roles of librarians and data archivists? This group of presenters will detail how they and their colleagues have been enabling this work at their institution through a variety of activities such as: identifying the needs of researchers, engaging researchers further upstream in the data life cycle, working with researchers and colleagues across disciplines, involving librarians, conducting trainings, developing learning materials and guidelines, and facilitating the implementation of data management plans.

    Presentation:
  • The Data Curation Profile
    Jake Carlson (Purdue University)

    [abstract]

    Data management is a growing area of service for data archives and university libraries alike. How do data professionals support researchers in their efforts to manage, disseminate, and preserve their research data? What are the roles of librarians and data archivists? This group of presenters will detail how they and their colleagues have been enabling this work at their institution through a variety of activities such as: identifying the needs of researchers, engaging researchers further upstream in the data life cycle, working with researchers and colleagues across disciplines, involving librarians, conducting trainings, developing learning materials and guidelines, and facilitating the implementation of data management plans.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...