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Conference Presentations 2010

  • IASSIST 2010-Social Data and Social Networking: Connecting Social Science Communities across the Globe, Ithaca, NY
    Host Institution: Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) and Cornell University Library (CUL)

F2: Data Management: Engaging Researchers and Crossing Disciplines (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Chair:Katherine McNeill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology LibrariesModerator: Gail Steinhart, Cornell University

  • Supporting Data Management Across Disciplines
    Katherine McNeill (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    [abstract]

    Data management is a growing area of service for data archives and university libraries alike. How do data professionals support researchers in their efforts to manage, disseminate, and preserve their research data? What are the roles of librarians and data archivists? This group of presenters will detail how they and their colleagues have been enabling this work at their institution through a variety of activities such as: identifying the needs of researchers, engaging researchers further upstream in the data life cycle, working with researchers and colleagues across disciplines, involving librarians, conducting trainings, developing learning materials and guidelines, and facilitating the implementation of data management plans.

    Presentation:

F3: Connecting with the Community: Stakeholder Participation in the Development and Operation of Qualitative Data Archives (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Moderator: Gavan McCarthy, University of Melbourne eScholarship Research Centre

  • Assessing models of stakeholder participation for the development and acceptance of the Australian Qualitative Archive
    Lynda Cheshire (The University of Queensland )
    Michael Emmison (The University of Queensland )
    Alex Broom (The University of Sydney)

    [abstract]

    The successful development and operation of a data archive depends upon establishing a close relationship with its users. For qualitative data archiving, this involves engaging with researchers to address the specific issues arising from the distinct characteristics of qualitative data; to develop joint solutions to the ethical challenges of data re-use; to encourage researcher up-take of the archive; and to create opportunities for collaboration in areas such as the creation of metadata and data management planning. In the case of Indigenous archives, moreover, the user community is extended to include Indigenous communities as partners in the compilation and repatriation of knowledge and data. In this session, we reflect on the process of engaging with stakeholders and respecting researcher autonomy in the operation of three qualitative data archives: the UK's Qualidata; the Australian Qualitative Archive; and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Data Archive.

  • Researchers exposed: Does archiving data reveal too much?
    Libby Bishop (University of Leeds & University of Essex )

    [abstract]

    The successful development and operation of a data archive depends upon establishing a close relationship with its users. For qualitative data archiving, this involves engaging with researchers to address the specific issues arising from the distinct characteristics of qualitative data; to develop joint solutions to the ethical challenges of data re-use; to encourage researcher up-take of the archive; and to create opportunities for collaboration in areas such as the creation of metadata and data management planning. In the case of Indigenous archives, moreover, the user community is extended to include Indigenous communities as partners in the compilation and repatriation of knowledge and data. In this session, we reflect on the process of engaging with stakeholders and respecting researcher autonomy in the operation of three qualitative data archives: the UK's Qualidata; the Australian Qualitative Archive; and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Data Archive.

    Presentation:
  • No humbugging: Curating Indigenous data to promote eResearch
    Elizabeth Mulhollann (University of Technology Sydney)
    Alex Byrne (University of Technology Sydney)
    Gabrielle Gardiner (University of Technology Sydney)
    Kirsten Thorpe (University of Technology Sydney)

    [abstract]

    The successful development and operation of a data archive depends upon establishing a close relationship with its users. For qualitative data archiving, this involves engaging with researchers to address the specific issues arising from the distinct characteristics of qualitative data; to develop joint solutions to the ethical challenges of data re-use; to encourage researcher up-take of the archive; and to create opportunities for collaboration in areas such as the creation of metadata and data management planning. In the case of Indigenous archives, moreover, the user community is extended to include Indigenous communities as partners in the compilation and repatriation of knowledge and data. In this session, we reflect on the process of engaging with stakeholders and respecting researcher autonomy in the operation of three qualitative data archives: the UK's Qualidata; the Australian Qualitative Archive; and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Data Archive.

F4: Providing Secure Access to Sensitive Data (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Moderator: Melanie Wright, UK Data Archive, University of Essex

  • NORC Data Enclave
    Tim Mulcahy (NORC)
    Pascal Heus (Metadata Technology)

    [abstract]

    Data services are now at a very exciting crossroad. The possibilities for innovative science represented by data merging, mashing, mining and mapping is rapidly expanding, as e-science web 2.0 worlds clamour for Open Data. Yet at the same time the power of these very techniques raises new concerns about data protection, as new techniques make the possibility of identifying individuals ever greater. Following some high profile data disclosure scandals and fearing public and respondent backlash, many data providers are seeking to place even greater restrictions on research access to detailed data. How can research access to data be preserved (and indeed expanded) whilst ensuring data security? This panel will compare and contrast existing options across the globe for providing secure access to sensitive data. Participants will include Tim Mulcahy/Pascal Heus from the NORC Secure Data Enclave (representing direct secure remote access to microdata), Stefan Bender from the German IAB (representing a remote execution service), a representative TBC from the Canadian Research Data Centres (representing networked safe centres), and a representative TBC from the US Census RDCs (representing stand-alone secure centres). The panel will be chaired by Melanie Wright, Director of the UK's new ESRC Secure Data Service.

    Presentation:
  • Data Access: Some "German" Thoughts about Past, Present and Future
    Stefan Bender (Forschungsdatenzentrum (FDZ) of the IAB)

    [abstract]

    Data services are now at a very exciting crossroad. The possibilities for innovative science represented by data merging, mashing, mining and mapping is rapidly expanding, as e-science web 2.0 worlds clamour for Open Data. Yet at the same time the power of these very techniques raises new concerns about data protection, as new techniques make the possibility of identifying individuals ever greater. Following some high profile data disclosure scandals and fearing public and respondent backlash, many data providers are seeking to place even greater restrictions on research access to detailed data. How can research access to data be preserved (and indeed expanded) whilst ensuring data security? This panel will compare and contrast existing options across the globe for providing secure access to sensitive data. Participants will include Tim Mulcahy/Pascal Heus from the NORC Secure Data Enclave (representing direct secure remote access to microdata), Stefan Bender from the German IAB (representing a remote execution service), a representative TBC from the Canadian Research Data Centres (representing networked safe centres), and a representative TBC from the US Census RDCs (representing stand-alone secure centres). The panel will be chaired by Melanie Wright, Director of the UK's new ESRC Secure Data Service.

    Presentation:
  • Providing Secure Access to Sensitive Data
    John Abowd (Cornell University)

    [abstract]

    Data services are now at a very exciting crossroad. The possibilities for innovative science represented by data merging, mashing, mining and mapping is rapidly expanding, as e-science web 2.0 worlds clamour for Open Data. Yet at the same time the power of these very techniques raises new concerns about data protection, as new techniques make the possibility of identifying individuals ever greater. Following some high profile data disclosure scandals and fearing public and respondent backlash, many data providers are seeking to place even greater restrictions on research access to detailed data. How can research access to data be preserved (and indeed expanded) whilst ensuring data security? This panel will compare and contrast existing options across the globe for providing secure access to sensitive data. Participants will include Tim Mulcahy/Pascal Heus from the NORC Secure Data Enclave (representing direct secure remote access to microdata), Stefan Bender from the German IAB (representing a remote execution service), a representative TBC from the Canadian Research Data Centres (representing networked safe centres), and a representative TBC from the US Census RDCs (representing stand-alone secure centres). The panel will be chaired by Melanie Wright, Director of the UK's new ESRC Secure Data Service.

    Presentation:

G1: Data Reference in Depth (Part II): Access, Citation, and Instruction (Fri, 2010-06-04)
Moderator: Bobray Bordelon, Princeton University

  • Data Reference In Depth: Access, Citation and Instruction
    Paul H. Bern (Syracuse University)

    [abstract]

    How does providing access to data, as a unique format, affect library reference services? This session will provide some answers to that question by exploring how three data librarians have built upon traditional approaches to reference work. First, Paul Bern will look into how data librarians craft the tools they use to guide researchers and answer questions with special focus on deciding which sources to put out there as a starting point for users and the process of evolving from a list of sources to a catalog of sources. Next, Hailey Mooney will consider how the seemingly simple request of bibliographic verification can be complicated by data citation practices. This will be investigated through a citation analysis of datasets used by faculty at a major research university. Finally, Kristin Partlo will look at how the data reference interview is especially crucial in the provision of research assistance, from the viewpoint of working with undergraduates at a small liberal arts college.

    Presentation:
  • Data Reference In Depth: Citation
    Hailey Mooney (Michigan State University)

    [abstract]

    How does providing access to data, as a unique format, affect library reference services? This session will provide some answers to that question by exploring how three data librarians have built upon traditional approaches to reference work. First, Paul Bern will look into how data librarians craft the tools they use to guide researchers and answer questions with special focus on deciding which sources to put out there as a starting point for users and the process of evolving from a list of sources to a catalog of sources. Next, Hailey Mooney will consider how the seemingly simple request of bibliographic verification can be complicated by data citation practices. This will be investigated through a citation analysis of datasets used by faculty at a major research university. Finally, Kristin Partlo will look at how the data reference interview is especially crucial in the provision of research assistance, from the viewpoint of working with undergraduates at a small liberal arts college.

    Presentation:
  • Pedagogy of the Data Reference Interview
    Kristin Partlo (Carleton College)

    [abstract]

    How does providing access to data, as a unique format, affect library reference services? This session will provide some answers to that question by exploring how three data librarians have built upon traditional approaches to reference work. First, Paul Bern will look into how data librarians craft the tools they use to guide researchers and answer questions with special focus on deciding which sources to put out there as a starting point for users and the process of evolving from a list of sources to a catalog of sources. Next, Hailey Mooney will consider how the seemingly simple request of bibliographic verification can be complicated by data citation practices. This will be investigated through a citation analysis of datasets used by faculty at a major research university. Finally, Kristin Partlo will look at how the data reference interview is especially crucial in the provision of research assistance, from the viewpoint of working with undergraduates at a small liberal arts college.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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