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Conference Presentations 2012

  • IASSIST 2012-Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information, Washington, DC
    Host Institution: National Opinion Research Center (NORC)

D2: Infrastructure to support research data management (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • ADA-Lab - A Virtual Laboratory for Australian Social Science Research
    Steven McEachern (Australian Data Archive, Australian National University)

    [abstract]

    This paper presents an overview of ADA-Lab, a virtual research laboratory for Australian social scientists. The recently completed ASeSS project established the Australian Data Archive (ADA), launched in August 2011 (www.ada.edu.au). ADA is now working to extend these services, to develop the ADA-Lab which will advance and develop our current services developed by: [a] continuing the extension and diversification of ADA's holdings into new thematic sub-archives and data formats; [b] further development of the ADA visualisation tools [c] creating the underlying architecture and capacity of the existing cloud service to support a viable virtual laboratory for ADA. The new ADA-lab environment will extend the existing ADA storage and online analysis facilities to provide an integrated environment for data access and computation using ADA and external data sources in a high-performance environment. The ADA-Lab environment consists of four elements: 1. Data storage foundation 2. Web analysis environment 3. Remote access environment 4. Secure environment The ADA-Lab development program will also provide a new set of researcher and archivist tools for enabling existing and new ADA data to be used in the ADA-Lab. The paper will provide an overview of the core ADA-Lab infrastructure, implementation plans, and an overview of progress to date.

    Presentation:
  • Data Service Infrastructure for the Social Sciences and Humanities, DASISH
    Michelle L Coldrey (Swedish National Data Service)

    [abstract]

    DASISH - Data Service Infrastructure for the Social Sciences and Humanities, brings together 5 ESFRI infrastructures within social science and humanities, namely CLARIN, SHARE, ESS, CESSDA, DARIAH with the focus on common activities across the disciplines and infrastructures and the aim of providing solutions to common problems, solutions that will strengthen international collaboration. Among the participants there are six CESSDA members: DANS, FSD, GESIS, NSD, SND and UKDA. DASISH is an EC 7th Framework project with a budget of € 6 million and is coordinated by SND. This presentation will elaborate on four main areas of the DASISH collaboration. 1. The digital research environment, which deals with data quality assurance in the production of primary data in the social sciences, 2. Tools and services, which deal with continuous data enrichment, metadata quality assurance, persistent identifiers and research discipline specific workflows, 3. Common Data Services which concerns digital preservation techniques, quality assessment of data centres and access to and availability of data through networks of community-based solutions and how this will be accomplished and 4. Legal and Ethics which deals with legal and ethics issues involved in preserving data and making them available.

    Presentation:

D3: Towards an integrated model for access to official microdata in Europe: First findings from the FP7 DwB project (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • Panel: Towards an Integrated Model for Access to Official Microdata in Europe: First Findings from the FP7 DwB Project
    Roxane Silberman (National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Réseau Quetelet )
    Marion Wittenberg (Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie Van Wetenschappen - Data Archiving and Networked Services (KNAW-DANS))
    Raphaelle Fleureux (National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Réseau Quetelet)

    [abstract]

    The session will present for discussions some preliminary outputs from the FP7 Data without Boundaries project about standards and harmonization issues for discovery, metadata, accreditation and access to official microdata within the European context. M. Wittenberg, M.Priddy, J.Sherpherdson ("Desired portal functionality for effective resource discovery on OS data across Europe") present the work undertaken about desired portal functionality for effective resource discovery: researchers expectations, constraints due to diversity in content and technical level of the various resources, metadata issues and identify the next steps for a possible architecture for the portal. C.Jayet, R.Fleureux, A. Mack, Ch. Wolf "(Servicing researchers in the use of European OS microdata") set forth the tools employed to cope with the difficulties encountered in using the existing metadata standards (DDI2 and 3) in the specific European case when documenting study programmes, studies and datasets from numerous institutions and countries and the metadata scheme proposed for documenting European official microdata both at national and European level with the aim of building a Service Centre for OS microdata in Europe. R. Silberman, P. Tubaro, M. Cros, B. Kleiner ("Access to official microdata and researcher accreditation: State of the art and future perspectives in Europe") map similarities and differences in national access and accreditation arrangements while pointing at commonalities for inter-operability and, ideally, adoption of common standards. D. Schiller ("A pilot for an European Remote Access Network - first results and upcoming challenges") presents preliminary outputs about the concept and architecture of a European distributed remote access for confidential official microdata coping with current legal constraints within Europe, security and standard issues, technical feasibility and researchers needs.

    Presentation:
  • Panel: Towards an Integrated Model for Access to Official Microdata in Europe: First Findings from the FP7 DwB Project
    Paola Tubaro (National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)-Réseau Quetelet )
    David Schiller (Und Berufsforschung Der Bundesagentur Für Arbeit (IAB) )

    [abstract]

    The session will present for discussions some preliminary outputs from the FP7 Data without Boundaries project about standards and harmonization issues for discovery, metadata, accreditation and access to official microdata within the European context. M. Wittenberg, M.Priddy, J.Sherpherdson ("Desired portal functionality for effective resource discovery on OS data across Europe") present the work undertaken about desired portal functionality for effective resource discovery: researchers expectations, constraints due to diversity in content and technical level of the various resources, metadata issues and identify the next steps for a possible architecture for the portal. C.Jayet, R.Fleureux, A. Mack, Ch. Wolf "(Servicing researchers in the use of European OS microdata") set forth the tools employed to cope with the difficulties encountered in using the existing metadata standards (DDI2 and 3) in the specific European case when documenting study programmes, studies and datasets from numerous institutions and countries and the metadata scheme proposed for documenting European official microdata both at national and European level with the aim of building a Service Centre for OS microdata in Europe. R. Silberman, P. Tubaro, M. Cros, B. Kleiner ("Access to official microdata and researcher accreditation: State of the art and future perspectives in Europe") map similarities and differences in national access and accreditation arrangements while pointing at commonalities for inter-operability and, ideally, adoption of common standards. D. Schiller ("A pilot for an European Remote Access Network - first results and upcoming challenges") presents preliminary outputs about the concept and architecture of a European distributed remote access for confidential official microdata coping with current legal constraints within Europe, security and standard issues, technical feasibility and researchers needs.

    Presentation:

D4: Preserving and organising qualitative social science data resources for sharing and re-use (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • Panel: Preserving and Organising Qualitative Social Science Data Resources for Sharing and Re-use
    Ruth Geraghty (National University of Ireland)

    [abstract]

    The session will be the shared responsibility of the DDI Alliance Exchange Qualitative data Working Group (Contact: Anne Sofie Fink, asf@dda.dk) Qualitative social science research generates complex data in a wide range of formats, including text, audio and visual. Making such materials available and usable to other researchers for secondary analysis requires professional standards of documentation and preparation of data, appropriate licensing arrangements, and ongoing data management and user support. A key initiative on standards and data management is taken by the DDI Alliance Qualitative Data Working Group. The group has proposed a conceptual meta model adding to the DDI-Lifecycle for qualitative data resources. An accompanying paper presents the challenges for a unified approach towards managing, archiving and accessing qualitative data, use of a controlled vocabulary for producing metadata as well as a requirement analysis. Additionally the paper introduces a number of cutting-edge tools for sharing and re-using qualitative data developed by data archives, universities and organisations. The session invites papers addressing all issues related to the title: “Preserving and organising qualitative social science data resources for sharing and re-use on”.

    Presentation:

E1: National Data Landscapes: Policies, Strategies, and Contrasts (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • Open Data in Slovenia: An Assessment of Accountability among Stakeholders
    Janez Stebe (Social Science Data Archives, University of Ljubljana)

    [abstract]

    Social science data archives (ADP) hold a project with the short title ‘Open data'. The goal is to articulate a general strategy of open research data access in Slovenia, in all scientific disciplines and in accordance with OECD principles. In order to assess the initial conditions in the area of data handling in a country we conducted a series of half-structured interviews with different target stakeholders. The emphasis was on stories about the problems foreseen in open data access, and about suggested solutions to overcome barriers. We would like to present results of that preliminary study. The questions were about the accountability and mutual expectations of various stakeholders such as data creators and users, specialised services (e.g. research libraries) and policymakers. We inquired about the existence of specialised competencies, and need for collaboration of different professional communities. Comparison with studies about situations in other countries shows prevailing similarity. Slovene scientific community expressed high level of awareness about best practices in data handling that steam from intensive international cooperation. Concern was expressed about the lack of policy of incentives to motivate additional data exchange, and little support infrastructure, together with the need to develop additional competencies in information service oriented activities.

    Presentation:
  • Infrastructure for Evidence-based Resaerch and Statistical Education in Russia
    Anna Bogomolova (Moscow State University)
    Tatyana Yudina (Moscow State University)
    Natalia Dyshkant (Moscow State University)

    [abstract]

    Statistical knowledge is one of the main competences of next generation specialists. One by one country declared statistical education as a national priority and launched programs to improve teaching and training in data understanding and analysis. Universities play a leading role. Following other countries Russian university community is working to enhance statistical education. First step is to compose modern statistical information infrastructure. The core is databases designed and maintained under the Moscow State University-based Information System RUSSIA The databases keep social and economic indicators at regional and local levels with annual and monthly update and are complimented by graphics- and map-based data visualization. System and comparative analysis tools are accomplished. Tutorials are implemented to train users. The first one is available to assist in evidence-based investigations in public administration. Work underway is on public administration domain ontology to integrate statistical indicators and analytical publications. The databases are available for free to all RF universities, colleges, think tanks, academic institutes, NGO, public libraries, specialists and citizens and serve for statistical culture dissemination in Russian society. The resource is of special value for local level powers - Russian national statistical agency Rosstat has only 3 years ago started to publish local level data. The UIS RUSSIA databases provide for more developed analytical services.

    Presentation:
  • Strategies of Promoting the Use of Survey Research Data Archive
    Meng-Li Yang (Center For Survey Research RCHSS, Academia Sinica)

    [abstract]

    The Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) at Academia Sinica in Taiwan has large collections of data from both the government and the academia. In a recent survey on the more than 3,000 active researchers in humanities and social sciences, however, 52% did not hear of SRDA. Among those who ever tried SRDA but gave up (N=257), 17% complained that information provided about data sets was insufficient for an effective search, and another 17% said similarly that they could not find what they needed. Basically, the improvements that SRDA must make are sketched in the above survey results, i.e., the promotion of SRDA and better and more metadata for the archived datasets. For these goals, we devise several strategies. First, produce demonstrations of uses of survey data sets on the website. Second, make power point files of SRDA introductions and send them to college professors for use in class or for research reference. Third, revise abstracts and keywords of datasets. Fourth, construct metadata on Nesstar. Fifth, add a search function that bridges the gap between the restricted and non-restricted data collections.

    Presentation:
  • A Tale of Two Eagles: Comparing and Contrasting the Social Science Data Landscapes in the USA and Germany
    Stefan Kramer (German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) )
    Denis Huschka (German Data Forum)

    [abstract]

    The landscape of research, resources, involved organizations, and services related to social science data has developed quite differently in the USA and in Germany in the last few decades. For instance, while established (even if still developing) in the USA, the role of a designated “data librarian” in the academic/research environment is something quite new in Germany; while the federal statistical system in the USA is based on the activities of several dozen individual agencies, Germany has a single Federal Statistical Office, along with at least equally important central statistical offices for each of its states; and the practice of conducting a nationwide census of the population is established and largely unchallenged in the USA, but was so controversial in (West) Germany in the 1980s that it would not be undertaken again until 2011. Meanwhile, the ideas and challenges of sharing research data, planning for its management, providing curation services and persistent identifiers at appropriate levels for social science datasets, and developing and sharing best practices increasingly cross national boundaries and provide increasing opportunities for collaboration - between people and institutions in these two nations, and well beyond.

    Presentation:

E2: Data Professionals (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • Spline and Demand: A Profession Interpolates
    Jennifer A Green (University of Michigan)
    Joel Herndon (Duke University)

    [abstract]

    The increase and profusion of flavors of data librarianship, in the forms of service, management, curation and visualization have left many of the current data librarians wondering: what's the difference? Did the name of the profession get coopted to something brand new? Or are these "new breed" data librarians remixing or rebranding skills that social science data librarians have acquired through time? Or does the proliferation and change of descriptions actually signal a maturation of the profession? In this paper we will analyze position descriptions from job ads for data-related positions (largely in the US & Canada) from the last 4 years, present some in-depth case studies of data librarians in various forms, map the positions in their organizational contexts, and submit some suggestions for future job description language and content to the IASSIST audience for scrutiny and reflection.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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