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Conference Presentations 2012

  • IASSIST 2012-Data Science for a Connected World: Unlocking and Harnessing the Power of Information, Washington, DC
    Host Institution: National Opinion Research Center (NORC)

E2: Data Professionals (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • The State of Education for Data Curation and Librarianship
    Susan R Rathbun-Grubb (University of South Carolina)

    [abstract]

    Funding agencies increasingly require detailed plans for data management, sharing, and archiving during the grant submission process. Researchers may lack the knowledge required to design and implement a feasible plan for long term storage and secondary analysis of their data, such as technical specifications, metadata standards, and archival challenges pertinent to the types of data they will collect. Librarians, information specialists, and grants compliance administrators in university settings are the natural partners of these researchers; however, these partners may also lack the necessary expertise in managing the data lifecycle. This paper will report the extent to which programs in schools of library and information science (LIS) are formally preparing students for positions in data curation and data librarianship. The results of a content analysis (currently in progress) of North American LIS program websites (iSchools caucus members and American Library Association-accredited programs) will be presented. This presentation will offer a comprehensive snapshot of the courses, certifications, tracks of study, centers/institutes, and grant-funded initiatives that are currently available to those who wish to work in data curation, in the hopes of initiating a conversation about the skills and knowledge needed by data professionals and how LIS programs can help to prepare them.

  • Data Management Training to Support Faculty Research Needs: Lessons Learned
    Ryan Womack (Rutgers University)

    [abstract]

    To build the skills of its Data Team, the Rutgers University Libraries have developed an internal Research Data Management course. The RUresearch Data Team brings together subject librarians, metadata librarians, and the technical staff working with the RUresearch data portal. The goal of the course is to instill in all team members a baseline knowledge of all aspects of data management necessary to support faculty's research data needs. The entire team meets together approximately monthly for a two hour class. In between class sessions, group homework assignments and discussion reinforce the concepts. The class modules cover these topics and more: the data model; metadata; controlled vocabularies, ontologies, and linked data; data preservation and reuse; the data lifecycle; use cases; designing a research portal; and workflow management. The presentation will present the findings from interviews of course participants and instructors that explore their reactions to the course. What do subject librarians without prior exposure to data issues take away from it? How does learning about the data needs of researchers affect technical staff? What lessons did the Libraries learn from running such a course? This presentation will provide the answers.

    Presentation:
  • Archives as a market regulator, or how can archives connect supply and demand?
    Laurence Horton (GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)
    Laurence Horton (GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)

    [abstract]

    What do researchers need from archives? What do archives need from researchers? These questions cover two types of researchers that encounter data archives: data creators and data reusers. These groups have different needs and it is archives that mediate between them. The role of an archive for creators is to support them in producing quality data, metadata and documentation and to facilitate wide and multipurpose data dissemination. By supporting multipurpose reuse to the fullest extent possible, archives help realise the value of public investment in academic research. This paper discusses the optimisation of research data management training and support for research data creators and data dissemination and long-term preservation for social science data archives. It outlines the GESIS plan to create a research data management and archive training centre for the cessda-ERIC European research area, to cater for both data supply and data demand. The training centre will look to ensure excellence in the creation and long-term preservation of reusable data in the cessda-ERIC area, contribute to promoting and adaptating standards in research data management and promote data availability and reuse. Finaly, the centre will provide and coordinate training on technologies and tools used by data professionals.

    Presentation:

E3: Latin America, Spain, and Portugal Data Organizations and Resources: An Evolving Discussion (Thu, 2012-06-07)

  • Panel: Latin America, Spain, and Portugal Data Organizations and Resources: An Evolving Discussion
    Stuart Macdonald (University of Edinburgh)
    Luis Martinez Uribe (Juan March Institute, Madrid)
    Paola Bongiovani (Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentina)
    Alyson Williams (Inter-American Development Bank)
    Aída Villanueva (Inter-American Development Bank)

    [abstract]

    Stuart Macdonald will report on progress of the IASSIST Engaging Spanish Speakers Action Group that he co-chairs with Luis Martinez Uribe including the organization of a series of webinars, the preparation of an IASSIST session and the translation of main IASSIST landing pages. We will then hear about practice in action in Latin America. Patricia Bermúdez Arboleda will discuss the explosion of research in Latin America and the Andean Region. In particular, for the Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Ecuador, the challenge is assumed through the institutional project of the Andean Virtual Academic Centre, FLACSO ANDES. The present work explores the creation process of the virtual center as well as the concrete situations that are being experienced during its implementation, appropriation and use. Paola Bongiovani will discuss research data access and management initiatives in Argentina. The Database National Systems initiative by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation (MINCyT) includes the National System of Biological Data, the National System of Sea Data, the National System of Digital Repositories, and the National System of Climate Data. Research data access and management legislation was promoted by MINCyT and it is now being discussed by Argentinean Congress. The National Council of Scientific and Technological Research is developing the Interactive Platform for Social Sciences Research to create an appropriate environment for data sharing, to allow interdisciplinary approaches and to contribute to the understating of complex problems. National University of Rosario is conducting a study to learn researchers' needs regarding repository services for data management and access. This will be followed by presentations of 3 librarians who will provide information you can take back to your institutions to help answer questions. An overview of the data produced at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) as well as the resources compiled by librarians at the IDB's Felipe Herrera Library will be provided by IDB's Alyson Williams and Aída Villanueva. Todd Hines will conclude with an overview of the major Latin American finance data resources available to non-commercial users.

  • Panel: Latin America, Spain, and Portugal Data Organizations and Resources: An Evolving Discussion
    Todd Hines (Princeton University)
    Patricia Bermudez (Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO), Ecuador)

    [abstract]

    Stuart Macdonald will report on progress of the IASSIST Engaging Spanish Speakers Action Group that he co-chairs with Luis Martinez Uribe including the organization of a series of webinars, the preparation of an IASSIST session and the translation of main IASSIST landing pages. We will then hear about practice in action in Latin America. Patricia Bermúdez Arboleda will discuss the explosion of research in Latin America and the Andean Region. In particular, for the Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Ecuador, the challenge is assumed through the institutional project of the Andean Virtual Academic Centre, FLACSO ANDES. The present work explores the creation process of the virtual center as well as the concrete situations that are being experienced during its implementation, appropriation and use. Paola Bongiovani will discuss research data access and management initiatives in Argentina. The Database National Systems initiative by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation (MINCyT) includes the National System of Biological Data, the National System of Sea Data, the National System of Digital Repositories, and the National System of Climate Data. Research data access and management legislation was promoted by MINCyT and it is now being discussed by Argentinean Congress. The National Council of Scientific and Technological Research is developing the Interactive Platform for Social Sciences Research to create an appropriate environment for data sharing, to allow interdisciplinary approaches and to contribute to the understating of complex problems. National University of Rosario is conducting a study to learn researchers' needs regarding repository services for data management and access. This will be followed by presentations of 3 librarians who will provide information you can take back to your institutions to help answer questions. An overview of the data produced at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) as well as the resources compiled by librarians at the IDB's Felipe Herrera Library will be provided by IDB's Alyson Williams and Aída Villanueva. Todd Hines will conclude with an overview of the major Latin American finance data resources available to non-commercial users.

    Presentation:

F1: Accessing Historic Records using Modern Tools (Fri, 2012-06-08)

  • Crowdsourcing the Past with Addressing History
    Stuart Macdonald (EDINA, University of Edinburgh)

    [abstract]

    The JISC-funded AddressingHistory project, led by the EDINA at the University of Edinburgh in partnership with the National Library of Scotland has created a online crowdsourcing tool and API which enables a broad spectrum of users (particularly local and family history groups, and genealogists) to combine data from digitised historical Scottish Post Office Directories (POD) for Edinburgh (1785, 1865, 1905 in the first instance), with contemporaneous historical maps. The technologies deployed are scalable for the full collection of 670 Post Office Directories covering the whole of Scotland. Phase 2 funding has developed functionality complementary to the original work and broadened geographic coverage of content. Work included spatial searching, and enhancing the geo-parsing process via discreet configuration files. Multiple addresses (i.e. entries where individuals have more than one domestic address) were also made explicit for searching purposes. Additional content for Edinburgh as well as Glasgow and Aberdeen (1881, 1886, 1891) to coincide with census (and an inter-census) years has been incorporated into the web tool, and a mobile Augmented Reality application will be added shortly. This presentation will discuss in more detail the social and technical approaches adopted in both phases of the project.

    Presentation:
  • Three Layers: investigating the potential of data, records and context
    Michael Jones (University of Melbourne)
    Gavin McCarthy (University of Melbourne)

    [abstract]

    The University of Melbourne's eScholarship Research Centre is currently working on a number of projects requiring the preparation, submission, preservation and dissemination of multiple types of information. Work on the Saulwick Age-Poll Archive involves paper-based and digital archives, a digital guide to records, micro-data from political polls managed by the Australian Data Archive (ADA), and the proposed development of a context layer to maintain authoritative information on key people, organisations, events and subjects. Similarly, work on important historical social science data collected by Wilfred Prest and the Reverend Robert Richard U'Ren has involved extracting that data from hard-copy archival records for deposit with ADA. Drawing on these examples, we will explore the benefits of treating context, records and data as separate (but interrelated) 'layers', each with their own requirements and limitations. There are challenges involved, particularly when managing boundaries and information flows between each layer. Addressing these through effective collaboration between 'traditional' archives, data archives and contextual information managers is essential to success; and the needs of all three elements need to be considered and balanced to fully realise the potential of historical and current research data and related material.

    Presentation:
  • Digital Reproductions of Authentic Materials for Teaching Early American History: Opportunities and Challenges for Networking Multilingual Records and Historic Maps
    Laina Madeline W Padgett (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)

    [abstract]

    Traditionally, textbooks treating early American history have been written with Anglo-American biases. While many facts are irrefutable, certain socio-cultural perspectives have tainted the multicultural reality of American history. In conventional textbooks, initial English colonies are prominent, yet settlements established contemporaneously by the French and Spanish receive little attention. Growth of Britain's thirteen colonies is presented. However, Spanish development (Florida, Mexico) and French establishments (Canada, Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico) are hardly mentioned. After the American Revolution, the focus is on the nation's westward expansion, including the Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clark's Expedition. Yet germane facts remain neglected: Napoleon sold Louisiana due to political uprisings in Saint-Domingue. Sacagawea was indispensable to the success of Lewis and Clark, who might not have survived without her unique communicative capabilities in several Native American languages. Appreciation for America's multicultural past could be enriched by linking multi-perspective narratives to digital reproductions of historic maps, letters, journals, treatises, etc. written in English and other languages. Unfortunately, many historic documents remain inaccessible. This study first considers incorporation of authentic digital resources into educational materials and then explores tensions between “fair use” and institutions' claims of copyright protection over reproductions of public domain works housed in their collections.

    Presentation:

F2: Data management and curation interest group presents: Managing government data assets (Fri, 2012-06-08)

  • Reuse and Remix of Government and Public Sector Data
    Minglu Wang (Rutgers University)
    Joshua Horowitz (Rutgers-Newark New Jersey DataBank)
    Danielle Farrie (Education Law Center)
    Peijia Zha (Newark Schools Research Collaborative, Rutgers-Newark)

    [abstract]

    Data management is integral to the provision of services in most organizations. With the increased global focus on managing data assets, and financial pressures internationally forcing governments to consider innovative methods of maximising returns to investment in data, this panel will draw upon experiences from a variety of service providers to examine some of these issues and highlight strategies that have evolved and are evolving in response to these challenges.  Minglu Wang will present on data management issues on government and public sector's data reuse and remix, especially systems built up by research centers/schools, but for the public use.

    Presentation:
  • Maximising Returns to Government Investment in Data: Data Management
    Tanvi Desai (London School of Economics)

    [abstract]

    Data management is integral to the provision of services in most organizations. With the increased global focus on managing data assets, and financial pressures internationally forcing governments to consider innovative methods of maximising returns to investment in data, this panel will draw upon experiences from a variety of service providers to examine some of these issues and highlight strategies that have evolved and are evolving in response to these challenges. Tanvi Desai will examine managing government administrative data to maximise returns to investment in data collection.

    Presentation:
  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...