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Conference Presentations 2013

  • IASSIST 2013-Data Innovation: Increasing Accessibility, Visibility, and Sustainability, Cologne, Germany
    Host Institution: GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

D5: Perspectives: Challenges for Multi-Disciplinary Research Data Infrastructures (Thu, 2013-05-30)
Chair:Leonie Schaefer

  • Challenges for Multi-Disciplinary Research Data Infrastructures
    Harry Enke (Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP))
    Jochen Klar (Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP))

    [abstract]

    The flood of digital data, which arises from studies in the social sciences or results from satellite missions in earth or space sciences, is growing rapidly. The permanent storage and its provision for future generations of researchers represent a challenge to the entire science system, however, many questions still remain unresolved. Financial aspects, organizational and technology issues in creating multi-disciplinary research data infrastructures, as well as legal and political framework need to be clarified. These challenges will be discussed in the context of this session, which will take the form of a discussion panel introduced by four presentations The data life cycle will serve as the guideline for the presentations which take a closer look at its specific challenges. The overall objective is the development of a multi-disciplinary research data infrastructure. The second presentation takes a closer look at the Group Domain represented by VREs.

    Presentation:
  • Challenges for Multi-Disciplinary Research Data Infrastructures: Preservation = Persistent Domain
    Torsten Rathmann (German Climate Computing Center (DKRZ))

    [abstract]

    The flood of digital data, which arises from studies in the social sciences or results from satellite missions in earth or space sciences, is growing rapidly. The permanent storage and its provision for future generations of researchers represent a challenge to the entire science system, however, many questions still remain unresolved. Financial aspects, organizational and technology issues in creating multi-disciplinary research data infrastructures, as well as legal and political framework need to be clarified. These challenges will be discussed in the context of this sesison, which will take the form of a discussion panel introduced by four presentations. The data life cycle will serve as the guideline for the presentations which take a closer look at its specific challenges. The overall objective is the development of a mulit-disciplinary research data infrastructure. The thrid presentation deals with challenge of the Persisten Domain such as cost structures and risk management.

    Presentation:
  • Challenges for Multi-Disciplinary Research Data Infrastructures: The Private Domain
    Dieter Van Uytvanck (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI-PL))

    [abstract]

    The flood of digital data, which arises from studies in the social sciences or results from satellite missions in earth or space sciences, is growing rapidly. The permanent storage and its provision for future generations of researchers represent a challenge to the entire science system, however, many questions still remain unresolved. Financial aspects, organizational and technology issues in creating multi-discipllinary research data infrastructures, as well as legal and political framework need to be clarified. These challenges will be discussed in the context of this session, which will take the form of a discussion panel introduced by four presentations. The data life cycle will serve as a gudieline for the presentaitons which take a closer look at its specific challenges. The overall objective is the development of a multi-disciplinary research data infrastructure. This session will discuss challenges of the Private Domain.

    Presentation:
  • Challenges for Multi-Disciplinary Research Data Infrastructures: The Public Domain
    Ralph Muller-Pfefferkorn (Technische Universitat Dresden (ZIH))

    [abstract]

    The flood of digital data, which arises from studies in the social sciences or results from satelllite missions in earth or space sciences, is growing rapidly. The permanent storage and its provision for future generations of researchers represent a challenge to the entire science system, however, many questions still remain unresolved. Financial aspects, organizational and technology issues in creating multi-disciplinary research data infrastructures, as well as the legal and political framework need to be clarified. These challenges will be discussed in the context of this sesison, which will take the form of a discussion panel introduced by four presentations. The data life cycle will serve as the guideline for the presentations which take a closer look at its specific challenges. The overall objective is the development of a mulit-disciplinary research data infrastructure. This presentation covers the challenges of the Public Domain and present best practices.

E1: IFDO: Institutional Data Policies in 40+ Countries (Thu, 2013-05-30)
Moderator: Sami Borg

  • IFDO Survey on Research Funders' Data Policies
    Vigdis Namtvedt Kvalheim (International Federation of Data Organizations (IFDO) )

    [abstract]

    In 2012 and early 2013, International Federation of Data Organizations (IFDO) carried out an expert survey on research funders' data policies in 40+ countries. The survey aims to give an overview of the frequency and of the quality of such requirements and the guidelines which promote data sharing.

    Presentation:
  • Dynamics of Data Sharing and Data Policies in Germany
    Ekkehard Mochmann (International Federation of Data Organizations (IFDO))

    [abstract]

    In early 2012 and early 2013, International Federation of Data Organizations (IFDO) carried out an expert survey on research funders' data policies in 40+ coutnries. This presentation is a case study on country and funder specific policies in Germany.

    Presentation:
  • Data Sharing in Taiwan: Policies and Practice
    Ruoh-rong Yu (Center for Survey Research, Research Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan)
    Presentation:

E2: Making Complex Confidential Microdata Useable (Thu, 2013-05-30)
Chair:Jennifer Darragh

  • Towards a Procedure to Anonymize Micro Data: Anonymizing Data from Offical Statistics for Public Use
    Katelijn Gysen (Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences (FORS))

    [abstract]

    In general, the data collected by a national statistical office relies on large samples, regular data collection and mostly long time series, which makes the data interesting for secondary use. In order to give public access to this data, the issue of finding a good balance between the re-identification risk of the respondents and the utility of the data has to be dealt with. Several projects and publications in the field of Statistical Disclosure Control describe successfully the possiblities of statistics and have developed tools to anoymize; whereas little ha been published on thresholds to guarantee an acceptable balance between the re-identification risk and the data-utility. This presentation will give insight ot the work that has been done by FORS in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (SFSO) towards a procedure to anoymize data such that the data can be provided to the public. The procedure describes how to define and reach the required level of anonymity of a respondent. Of course, this procedure and the thresholds can be adjusted for any other dissemination of micro-data, e.g. survey data collected by researchers interested in making their data available for secondary use.

    Presentation:
  • The Research Data Centre (RDC) in the Cloud
    Ingo Barkow (German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF))
    David Schiller (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))

    [abstract]

    IT processes in Research Data Centers need extensive administrative resources especially if there is also service for external customers like remote access or remote execution users. Some of those issues could be solved by external cloud services. This means all metadata and research data are shifted from the internal data center to an outside provider who guarantees high service levels, redundancy and availability. Nevertheless the challenge of handing out the data causes legal and technological challenges. This presentation will discuss those implications from scientific and technical sides with the examples of the German situation considering limitations provided by the data protection laws and other regulations. Furthermore, we will also discuss how this change in paradigm and especially the advantages can be communicated to data producers, decision makers, research data institutions, data archives and scientists as additionally we predict a lot of mistrust in cloud-based external data hosting.

  • Legally Bound? Data Protection Legislation and Research Practice
    Laurence Horton (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)
    Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)

    [abstract]

    This paper explores how data archives provide a service facilitating the gap between legal data protection requirements and research practices. Researchers encounter legal frameworks concerning data protection in all phases of the data-lifecycle, but research practice - without due care - can clash with these frameworks. Social science archives can intervene, helping researchers navigate an environment which simultaneously pushes data sharing, and consideration of the individual's right to privacy. These aims are not mutually exclusive, but pressure on researchers to 'get it right' when collecting, storing, analyzing, and anoymizing data has never been greater. We examine how archives can intervene in stages of the data-lifecycle, against the context of German and British regulatory requirements. We propose that whilst differences exist in the substance of laws (e.g. Bundesdatenschutzgesetz and Data Protection Act), research cultures, and funding environments, archives face similar challeges in the data reuse/privacy dynamic. With research innovations such as geo-referenced data, and increasingly, cross-national collaborative projects exisiting either across national laws or outside established legal frameworks - the regulatory grounding is not firm. Here facilitiation becomes an act of setting best-practice standards as guidance and, we suggest, data archives are best suited to be guides.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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