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Conference Presentations 2014

  • IASSIST 2014-Aligning Data and Research Infrastructure, Toronto
    Host Institution: University of Toronto, Ryerson University, and York University

4N: Integrated Data Discovery and Access (Wed, 2014-06-04)
Chair:Lynda Kellam

  • Integrating PROV with DDI: Mechanisms of data discovery within the US Census Bureau
    Bill Block (Cornell University)
    Warren Brown (Cornell University)
    Jeremy Williams (Cornell University)
    Lars Vilhuber (Cornell University)
    Carl Lagoze (University of Michigan)

    [abstract]

    Within the United States Census Bureau, datasets are often derived by complex methods that are not always well documented. This derivation process, or provenance, can be hard to understand for a researcher attempting to use or explore a given dataset. Without understanding the provenance of a dataset, it can be impossible establish whether it is appropriate to use for a given investigation, because its history remains a black box with no way to see inside. The infrastructure upon which the semantic web is built provides a means to label the relationships of social science datasets with logical meaning according to standardized ontologies and controlled vocabularies. This paper outlines the work of the Comprehensive Data Documentation and Access Repository (CED2AR) to integrate provenance metadata encoded according to the W3C PROV ontology with a DDI-based repository with the aim of making US Census data more discoverable and accessible.

    Presentation:

1D: Teaching Data Management and Statistical Literacy (Wed, 2014-06-04)
Chair:Jackie Carter

  • Creating a large-cale collection of genuinely teacher-ready teaching datasets
    Bronia Flett (SAGE Publications)
    Patrick Brindle (SAGE Publications)

    [abstract]

    SAGE Publications is in the process of starting to put together a large collection of many 100s of teaching datasets that can enable faculty, new researchers and students to teach or self-teach across a wide range of many 100s of analytic techniques. The collection will cover quantitative and qualitative data, but comes with many developmental challenges in terms of working out how to best develop different datasets to showcase markedly different methodological techniques and to do so in way that is easy to understand, easy to use and, perhaps, even fun for the user. This paper will summarise the challenges that the editorial team face in pulling together what will be an unprecedentedly large collection of teaching datasets and will canvas audience feedback on what might be seen as must-have or best practice from a librarian and library-user perspective. This aims to be an open-minded session and an opportunity for delegates to work closely with a publisher on thinking through some difficult yet important issues at the very start of a new project.

    Presentation:
  • Managing and curating undergraduate-generated qualitative data
    Peter Rogers (Colgate University)

    [abstract]

    This paper reports on a project at Colgate University. The Department of Sociology and Anthropology (SOAN), working with the library and Information Technology Services, is creating an archive for students’ qualitative data. SOAN has clear pedagogical goals for this project. One, allow students doing local research to build upon the work of previous students who have done similar projects and to avoid duplication of effort. Two, make greater use of student data. Often the student who does the data collection spends most of their time on that and has little time left over for data analysis. Three, give students a fuller data collection, analysis, and management experience. I will report upon my experiences as the data librarian on this project and the lessons that have been learned. At the moment, we are using a Dataverse on the Harvard Dataverse Network. This has been easy to create, but it means that we have to conform to certain standards built into this network. There are also challenges associated with the focus on qualitative data which can include interview transcripts, scanned magazine ads, and text from newspapers and other documentary sources.

    Presentation:
  • Developing data literacies for graduate students in the social sciences
    Hailey Mooney (Michigan State University)
    Jake Carlson (Purdue University)

    [abstract]

    What competencies in working with data do graduate students in the Social Sciences need to acquire before they graduate? What roles can librarians and other information professionals play in teaching these competencies to graduate students? This paper will report on preliminary findings from an investigation into the data management competencies and skill gaps of graduate students in the social sciences. Building from the work of the Data Information Literacy (DIL) project (http://datainfolit.org), this study uses an interview-based approach to discern how competencies in working with data are understood and valued by graduate students and their faculty advisors. The DIL project identified and employed 12 data competencies as starting points for interviews and for developing educational programming on data literacies for graduate students. As the original DIL project focused on students in five different STEM fields, this extended study into the social sciences (DIL-SS) will allow for comparisons of perceptions and practices between these disciplines. In addition, DIL-SS presents an opportunity to further develop the 12 DIL competencies and test their relevance to educational needs in the social sciences. Our findings will inform the work of librarians and others involved in offering data management education and consulting services in academic settings.

    Presentation:
  • Using pedagogical data to teach social science
    Colin Elman (Syracuse University)
    Diana Kapiszewski (Georgetown University)
    Dessislava Kirilova (Syracuse University)

    [abstract]

    This paper focuses on the use of qualitative research data and related teaching tools to enhance instruction in undergraduate and graduate social science courses. We discuss the pedagogical benefits that using qualitative data in the classroom can provide. First, combining exemplary articles and books with the data that underlie those studies allows for a more effective description of the methods being taught and better demonstration of how they work. Second, with access to data, students can more effectively practice using the methods about which they are learning through applying them in context to real social science problems; they are also introduced to the notion and practice of replication earlier in their academic trajectory. Third, through exposure to “real” qualitative data, students learn about the process of generating data in the context of the use of particular analytic methods, as well as about how to clearly document that generation.

  • Teaching data literacy skills in a lab environment
    Heather Coates (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI))

    [abstract]

    Equipping researchers with the skills to effectively utilize data in the global data ecosystem requires proficiency with data literacies and electronic resource management. This is a valuable opportunity for libraries to leverage existing expertise and infrastructure to address a significant gap data literacy education. This session will describe a workshop for developing core skills in data literacy. In light of the significant gap between common practice and effective strategies emerging from specific research communities, we incorporated elements of a lab format to build proficiency with specific strategies. The lab format is traditionally used for training procedural skills in a controlled setting, which is also appropriate for teaching many daily data management practices. The focus of the curriculum is to teach data management strategies that support data quality, transparency, and re-use. Given the variety of data formats and types used in health and social sciences research, we adopted a skills-based approach that transcends particular domains or methodologies. Attendees applied selected strategies using a combination of their own research projects and a carefully defined case study to build proficiency.

    Presentation:

2E: Data Without Borders (Wed, 2014-06-04)
Chair:Sylvie Lafortune

  • A microdata computation centre for de-centralized data sources
    David Schiller (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))
    Anja Burghardt (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))

    [abstract]

    The European Data without Boundaries (DwB) project proposes a Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) to access confidential microdata from different sources. A central service hub within Eu-RAN should host different services that support researchers and research projects. One of the attached services is a Microdata Computation Centre (MiCoCe). It is made to enable analysis of distributed data sources. Due to data security reasons, some of the most interesting data must stay physically in the facilities of the data owner. At the same time, there is an increasing demand on analysing data from different European sources simultaneously. The challenge is therefore twofold: enable analysis with distributed data sources while fulfilling the requirement of not moving the data. This talk will present the outcomes of a workshop held in Nuremberg, Germany, that focused on this topic. Data managers, IT-experts and statisticians discussed approaches that could support scientific research with decentralized data sources. Solutions come from the areas of grid computing, federated databases, statistical modelling and so forth. Having a service like the MiCoCe would enable the use of already available data sources in Europe and in addition make access to Big Data sources possible.

  • The beginnings of a European remote access network
    Anja Burghardt (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))
    David Schiller (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))
    Richard Welpton (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))

    [abstract]

    Data about individuals and organisations are routinely collected across the Member States of Europe, through surveys, administrative and financial transactions. Yet access to these micro-data for research purposes, particularly across national borders, is often restricted for confidentiality or legal reasons. Despite the benefits that accrue to society from allowing comparative research to be undertaken using cross-national data sources (such as policy evaluation), researchers face significant barriers in making comparative analyses of data collected in more than one Member State. Legal restrictions on the dissemination and transfer of data, and the consequential cost of visiting the data within its country of origin, prohibit access. – Through the “Data without Boundaries”(DwB) initiative, the European Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) is a vision of cross-border data access. The realisation of this European data infrastructure dream will evolve step-by-step. Making the first jump requires a connection between two Research Data Centres. The Research Data Centre (FDZ) at IAB and the Secure Lab at the UK Data Archive have joined forces to provide connections to each other’s centres. A researcher in the UK can access sensitive German micro-data held at IAB and vice versa. In this talk, we present the results of our joint-initiative.

    Presentation:
  • Single Point of Access (SPA): A service hub for a remote access network
    Anja Burghardt (Institute for Employment Research (IAB))
    David Schiller (Institute for Employment Research (IAB)The European Data without Boundaries (DwB) project proposes a Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) to access confidential microdata from different sources. A centralized Single Point of Access (SPA) will make it easier to reach several decentralized organized network points and ease the work of researchers running projects with data from different data owners within this Network. To support sophisticated transnational research the IT-Infrastructure of the Eu-RAN contains a service hub attached to the SPA, which provides different tools for accredited researchers. The services offered include but are not limited to secured virtual research environments, user account and contract management, interfaces to research data access, text editors, statistical software packages, and tools for cooperation like forums, wikis or instant messaging service. This talk will highlight added values a SPA will generate for researchers using the Eu-RAN. In addition outcomes of DwB discussions about detailed requirements and functionalities for such SPA are presented. Having a centralized access point equipped with the described Service Hub will ease research with different data sources in Europe and bring together researchers, National Statistical Institutes, data archives, data owners and access facilities by offering the basis for a vibrant community.)

    [abstract]

    The European Data without Boundaries (DwB) project proposes a Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) to access confidential microdata from different sources. A centralized Single Point of Access (SPA) will make it easier to reach several decentralized organized network points and ease the work of researchers running projects with data from different data owners within this Network. To support sophisticated transnational research the IT-Infrastructure of the Eu-RAN contains a service hub attached to the SPA, which provides different tools for accredited researchers. The services offered include but are not limited to secured virtual research environments, user account and contract management, interfaces to research data access, text editors, statistical software packages, and tools for cooperation like forums, wikis or instant messaging service. This talk will highlight added values a SPA will generate for researchers using the Eu-RAN. In addition outcomes of DwB discussions about detailed requirements and functionalities for such SPA are presented. Having a centralized access point equipped with the described Service Hub will ease research with different data sources in Europe and bring together researchers, National Statistical Institutes, data archives, data owners and access facilities by offering the basis for a vibrant community.

  • A new CESSDA portal for European research data discovery: progress to date
    John Shepherdson (UK Data Archive)
    Ornulf Risnes (Norwegian Social Science Data Services (NSD))
    Pascal Heus (Metadata Technology)

    [abstract]

    Work package 12 of the Data without Boundaries Project (http://www.dwbproject.org), focuses on development of a one-stop discovery portal for social and economic research data held by agencies across Europe. Implementation is a collaborative effort led by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services, the UK Data Archive and Metadata Technology, with assistance from others. The portal offers researchers an easy to use faceted search and browse interface, powered by Solr. Workflow activities (metadata harvesting, quality assurance, storage, versioning, harmonization, indexing and retrieval) are implemented as separate components – accessible via RESTful web services – and orchestrated by an administration component providing a dashboard showing activity health, and an error notification mechanism. Summary information (such as metadata quality, geographic coverage, list of providers, study languages) are visible to all users. The provider portfolio is a value added service that is intended to encourage take up by metadata providers, as it will allow them to see the quality scores for their metadata records, along with information that will help them fix any problems and improve future versions, plus usage statistics. This talk will provide a progress update and a brief demonstration, plus a roadmap for future development within the lifetime of the DwB project.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...