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Conference Presentations 2015

  • IASSIST 2015-Bridging the data divide: Data in the international context, Minneapolis
    Host Institution: University of Minnesota

C5: No tools, no standards - Software from the DDI community (Wed, 2015-06-03)
Chair:Johan Fihn, Marcel Hebing & Samuel Spencer

  • Web-based Solutions for Data Archiving and Dissemination Using DDI
    Adrian Dușa (Romanian Social Data Archive)

    [abstract]

    The acceptance and adoption of a standard like DDI highly depends on the availability of software tools to use it. The DDI Developers Community is a part of the DDI Alliance where software developers from around the world can meet and swap ideas on working with DDI in various programming environments and languages. In this session we like to give you an introduction to our work and present you a selection of available tools. This Session will give you an overview of tools available from the community. Most of the presenters will be available during the subsequent poster session for detailed questions or further demonstrations of their tools.

    Presentation:
  • TERESAH - Authoritative Knowledge Registry for Researchers
    Johan Fihn (SND Swedish National Data Service)

    [abstract]

    The acceptance and adoption of a standard like DDI highly depends on the availability of software tools to use it. The DDI Developers Community is a part of the DDI Alliance where software developers from around the world can meet and swap ideas on working with DDI in various programming environments and languages. In this session we like to give you an introduction to our work and present you a selection of available tools. This Session will give you an overview of tools available from the community. Most of the presenters will be available during the subsequent poster session for detailed questions or further demonstrations of their tools.

    Presentation:
  • Building a community platform for DDI Moving Forward
    Olof Olsson (SND Swedish National Data Service)

    [abstract]

    The acceptance and adoption of a standard like DDI highly depends on the availability of software tools to use it. The DDI Developers Community is a part of the DDI Alliance where software developers from around the world can meet and swap ideas on working with DDI in various programming environments and languages. In this session we like to give you an introduction to our work and present you a selection of available tools. This Session will give you an overview of tools available from the community. Most of the presenters will be available during the subsequent poster session for detailed questions or further demonstrations of their tools.

    Presentation:
  • Data Management Module
    Ingo Barkow (DIPF, German Institute for International Educational Research)

    [abstract]

    The acceptance and adoption of a standard like DDI highly depends on the availability of software tools to use it. The DDI Developers Community is a part of the DDI Alliance where software developers from around the world can meet and swap ideas on working with DDI in various programming environments and languages. In this session we like to give you an introduction to our work and present you a selection of available tools. This Session will give you an overview of tools available from the community. Most of the presenters will be available during the subsequent poster session for detailed questions or further demonstrations of their tools.

    Presentation:
  • DDI on Rails
    Marcel Hebing (ddionrails)

    [abstract]

    The acceptance and adoption of a standard like DDI highly depends on the availability of software tools to use it. The DDI Developers Community is a part of the DDI Alliance where software developers from around the world can meet and swap ideas on working with DDI in various programming environments and languages. In this session we like to give you an introduction to our work and present you a selection of available tools. This Session will give you an overview of tools available from the community. Most of the presenters will be available during the subsequent poster session for detailed questions or further demonstrations of their tools.

    Presentation:

Posters (Wed, 2015-06-03)

  • Easy DDI Organizer (EDO): Metadata management and survey planning tool based on DDI-Lifecycle
    Akira Motegi (University of Tokyo, Institute of Social Science)

    [abstract]

    We will introduce a metadata managing software project launched at Social Science Japan Data Archive (SSJDA), which is affiliated with Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo. The aim of the project is to develop Easy DDI Organizer (EDO), a metadata managing software which helps researchers to edit and manage metadata based on Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) 3.1. The implementation of DDI 3.1 consitutes one of the greatest features of EDO, in which researchers can record metadata such as study purpose, sampling procedure, mode of data collection, questions, question sequence, variable descriptions, and bibliographic information along with the scheme of data lifecycle. File-import/export function is another salient feature of EDO. It supports importing variable level metadata from SPSS files and exporting codebook and questionnaire. Our poster session will introduce the context and features of EDO with some demonstrations provided. We will also discuss its future improvements such as public release and other function enhancements.

    Presentation:
  • Linking DDI to the semantic web
    Benjamin Perry (Cornell University Institute for Social and Economic Research)
    Venkata Kambhampaty (Cornell University Institute for Social and Economic Research)
    Lars Vilhuber (Cornell University Institute for Social and Economic Research)
    William Block (Cornell University Institute for Social and Economic Research)

    [abstract]

    The Comprehensive Extensible Data Documentation and Access Repository (CED2AR), is an online repository for metadata on surveys, administrative microdata, and other statistical information. CED2AR runs directly from DDI 2.5 through a single, non-relational database. While the DDI schema is well developed for documentation purposes, it is not ideal for semantic web applications. Using the schema.org microdata markup, CED2AR allows search engines to parse semantic information from DDI. The solution further enhances the discoverability of DDI metadata, as the data are machine readable to several providers such as Google, Yahoo and Bing. The schema.org markup is not directly embedded within the DDI, so it doesn't directly export when a user downloads a codebook. However, CED2AR can also run as a zero install desktop application. Users can simply download their own copy of CED2AR, quickly import codebooks, and instantly see the schema.org enhancements the system offers. The only prerequisites for the software is Java version 7, and an internet browser. This presentation will demonstrate the advantages schema.org adds to DDI, and the ease of deployment CED2AR allows.

  • ICPSR: A common data platform serviing unique data needs
    Linda Detterman (ICPSR - University of Michigan)

    [abstract]

    ICPSR is a collection of data collections related to one another by a common data platform, common guidelines for data ingest and processing, and a common presentation of data for discovery (data catalog) and use by the data community. ICPSR's collections number almost 20 including a member (subscriber) collection, several agency and foundation collections, and most recently, a self-deposit, public-access collection. This poster will diagram and present ICPSR's shared infrastructure approach that enables research data collections to be unique from a common platform.

  • Using undergraduate students to provide data services
    Julia Bauder (Grinnell College)

    [abstract]

    Since 2010, the Data Analysis and Social Inquiry Lab (DASIL, pronounced “dazzle”) at Grinnell College has employed peer mentors to provide certain data services to students and faculty. These peer mentors--undergraduate students with backgrounds in statistics, economics, geographic analysis, computer science, and/or qualitative analysis—provide services including drop-in assistance to students working on data-driven projects in economics, GIS, psychology, and other social science disciplines; preparing data visualizations and data-driven exercises for faculty to use in their courses and datasets for them to use in their research; and providing hands-on assistance during in-class labs that involve data. The poster will cover the who, what, where, when, and why of using this model to provide data services at Grinnell, and also discuss how this experiment has worked out for us.

    Presentation:
  • The carrot that encourages data sharing and its support environment
    Florio Arguillas Jr. (Cornell University)

    [abstract]

    Less than a year after its implementation, CISER's data curation and reproduction of results service, a carrot that encourages Cornell social science researchers to share code and data associated with their publication, has evolved resulting from experiences learned along the way. This poster discusses how the service works, the issues encountered and how they were resolved, the costs involved and the factors influencing the costs; how the cost of the service has given rise to other services and trainings (data management, curation, metadata creation, code documentation and version control) that shifted labor to researchers and/or their assistants; and the supplementary post-reproduction services to promote and increase discoverability of the publications and their associated files.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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