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IASSIST Conferences

Conferences important to data professionals.

IASSIST & CARTO 2018 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Conference website: http://www.library.mcgill.ca/iassistcarto2018/

Conference hashtag: #iassistcarto

The 44th annual conference of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) will be jointly held with the 52nd annual conference of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries and Archives (ACMLA-ACACC) in Montréal, Québec, Canada from May 29-June 1, 2018.

Once Upon a Data Point: Sustaining our Data Storytellers

In many ways, researchers are data storytellers: they create compelling data-supported narratives for examining both historical and current social phenomena and for facilitating social change and reconciliation. We professionals who support these data storytellers play vital roles in giving their data stories life. We assist our data storytellers in:

  • Discovering existing and collecting new data from which to craft the stories.
  • Analyzing and managing data to uncover the stories hiding within.
  • Visualizing data to offer vivid and meaningful illustrations to enhance the stories.
  • Teaching data literacy skills to their audiences so they can understand and critique the stories.
  • Curating, archiving, and sharing data so that the stories are not lost for future generations, and so new data storytellers may weave even more stories from the data.

And we conduct our own research to tell our own stories and to also improve our support of other data storytellers.

We welcome submissions that tell diverse stories about our IASSIST and ACMLA-ACACC communities’ experiences, that offer conference attendees suggestions of how they can implement or adapt lessons for their own work, and that have wide-reaching appeal to our international attendees. Although the positive outcomes are always something people want to hear, there’s also an appetite for learning about the things that didn’t go well, particularly any problems you faced and how others might avoid or handle them.

So bring us your data comedies, tragedies, epics, horror stories, mysteries, histories, thrillers, adventures, fables, fantasies, science fiction, and even romances if you’ve got them! We look forward to sharing, learning from, and adapting each other's stories.

 

Submitting Proposals

We welcome submissions for papers, presentations, panels, posters, and Pecha Kuchas in English and French.

The Call for Presentations, along with the link to the submission form, is at: http://www.library.mcgill.ca/iassistcarto2018/call-for-proposals/ 

Questions about presentation submissions may be sent to the Program Co-Chairs (Jay Brodeur, Laurence Horton, and Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh) at iassist2018@gmail.com.

We are also accepting submissions for Pre-conference Workshops. The Call for Workshops, along with the link to the submission form, is at: http://www.library.mcgill.ca/iassistcarto2018/workshops/

Questions about workshop submissions may be sent to Workshop Coordinators, Jenny Muilenburg (jmuil@uw.edu) and Andy Rutkowski (arutkows@usc.edu).

Deadline for ALL submissions: 20 November 2017

Notification of acceptance: February 2018


Support for Attending the Conference

IASSIST Fellows Program supports data professionals from underrepresented regions and countries with emerging economies. IASSIST Early Professional Fellows Program helps early career data professionals recognizing the value of innovative ideas. Applications can be made at https://goo.gl/forms/dr6fie6XJyOKR4Ee2 and will close 19 January 2018.

Address questions about the Fellows Programs to Florio Arguillas (foa2@cornell.edu) and Stuart Macdonald (smacdee@outlook.com).

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New? (IASSIST 2017 Conference)

New to IASSIST or Willing to Mentor Someone New?

We are excited to have new members in IASSIST. IASSIST is a home for data services professionals across many disciplines: librarians, data archivists, open data proponents, data support staff, etc. For some, it is an organization where you don’t have to explain what you do because our members already understand. We get metadata, data support, data access issues, database challenges, the challenge of replication and so much more! Although we are a long-established organization, new members are the lifeblood of IASSIST!
Networking is a great benefit of attending the IASSIST conference but the week quickly goes by and and it can be daunting to join a lively group like this. To get the most out of your membership, we encourage everyone to join the IASSIST mentorship program.Please sign up by Friday, May 12 using Google Forms. Conference contact assignments for IASSIST will be emailed by the end of the day Tuesday, May 16.If for any reason the email link does not open for you, go to
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScyW2B9m8o5-6Z0D0FPdsTcqkOpUDk_w_u4WwuyIpDWgjAQJQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

If you have any questions, please contact Bobray Bordelon (bordelon@princeton.edu). Thank you for participating & see you in Lawrence, Kansas!


Bobray Bordelon
IASSIST 2017 Mentor Program Coordinator
Economics & Finance Librarian/Data Services Librarian
Princeton University Library
bordelon@princeton.edu

IASSIST's Statement in Response to President’s Executive Order on Visas and Immigration


February 13, 2017

Statement of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST at http://iassistdata.org) in response to President Trump's January 27 Executive Order on Visas and Immigration, titled "PROTECTING THE NATION FROM FOREIGN TERRORIST ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES".

The recent executive order on visas and immigration issued on January 27th by US President Trump is of grave concern to IASSIST as an organization. IASSIST, the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology, is an international organization of professionals working in and with information technology, libraries, data services and research & higher education to support open science, advocate for responsible data management and use, build a broader community surrounding research data, and encourage the development of data professionals. Our membership is international, and we greatly value the ability to travel and meet to share knowledge at locations around the world. Our international fellows program and other initiatives are specifically designed to encourage participation from underrepresented regions, including the Muslim-majority countries targeted by the executive order.

While recognizing the authority of the United States over its borders, there are several aspects of this order that are troubling, viz.:

  1. Its sudden and chaotic implementation has led to severe uncertainty over whether rules and practices for entering the United States will be subject to rapid and arbitrary change.
  2. It has led to the detention of lawful permanent residents of the United States, the revocation of visas previously granted under proper vetting procedures, the perception of potential discrimination on the basis of religion, and the humanitarian crisis caused by ceasing to accept refugees.
  3. Its introduction of several restrictive elements into the domain of visas and immigration, such as the statement that those entering the US, including temporary visitors, must "support the Constitution".

For these reasons, the order generates a hostile climate for the open, collaborative scientific work of our organization, both for non-US persons seeking to work and collaborate with Americans, and for Americans traveling and working outside of the US to collaborate who may face retributive actions from other states. Our membership has legitimate concerns about whether travel to the US is possible under such conditions. The order also may have long-term repercussions that damage the reputation of the US as a location that is open to visitors and immigrants, supporting the open exchange of ideas, and protected under the rule of law from arbitrary changes impacting human freedom. In response, IASSIST will continue to speak out in favor of our organization's goals, and against such threats to international collaboration in research and data sharing.

Our May 2017 annual conference will be held in Lawrence, Kansas. Arrangements were begun long before the Executive Order on Visas and Immigration, and it is impossible to change the venue at this date. IASSIST stands in solidarity with its members and encourages them to attend the conference and participate in the international exchange of ideas that is the purpose of our association. We hope that no member will be denied entry into the US due to the administration's recent actions. IASSIST will assist its membership with visa issues and other concerns emanating from this order. We also reaffirm that we are committed to an environment free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, at the annual conference and all IASSIST activities.

 Tuomas J. Alaterä, President
 Jen Green, Vice-President
 Ryan Womack, Secretary
 Thomas Lindsay, Treasurer

International Association for Social Science Information Service and Technology (IASSIST)

IASSIST 2017 Call for Proposals Now Open!

We are delighted to announce the call for proposals for the IASSIST 2017 Conference.

IASSIST 2017 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Data in the Middle: The common language of research

The 43rd annual conference of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST) will be held in Lawrence, Kansas from May 23-26, 2017. #iassist17

Many issues around data (sources, strategies, and tools) are similar across disciplines. While IASSIST has its roots in social science data, it has also welcomed discussions over the years of other disciplines' issues as they relate to data, data management, and support of users. So again this year, in line with this tradition, we are arranging a conference that will benefit those who support researchers across all disciplines: social sciences, health and natural sciences, and humanities. Please join the international data community in Lawrence, KS, "in the middle" of the U.S., for insights and discussion on how data in all disciplines are found, shared, used, and managed. Join us and draw inspiration from this diverse gathering! 

We welcome submissions for papers, presentations, panels, posters, and pecha kuchas.

The full Call for Proposals, along with the link to the submission form, can be accessed on the conference website here: 

http://www.iassist17.dept.ku.edu/proposals/

Questions can be directed to the Program Chairs, Samantha Guss and Michele Hayslett, at iassist2017@gmail.com.

 

Pre-conference Workshops

We are also accepting submissions for Pre-conference Workshops under a separate Call for Workshops, which can be accessed here: 

http://www.iassist17.dept.ku.edu/proposals/workshops/

Questions about workshops may be sent to the Workshop Coordinators, Jenny Muilenburg (jmuil@uw.edu) and Andy Rutkowski (arutkowski@library.ucla.edu).

 

Deadline for all submissions: 21 November 2016.

Notification of acceptance: February 2017.

IASSIST 2016 Program At-A-Glance, Part 2: Data infrastructure, data processing and research data management

 

Here's another list of highlights from IASSIST2016 which is focusing on the data revolution. For previous highlights, see here.

Infrastructure

  • For those of you with an interest in technical infrastructure, the University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur will showcase an early protype MMRepo (1 June, 3F), whose function is to store qualitative and quantitative data into one big data repository.
  • The UK Data Service will present the following panel "The CESSDA Technical Framework - what is it and why is it needed?", which elaborates how the CESSDA Research Infrastructure should have modern data curation techniques rooted in sophisticated IT capabilities at its core, in order to better serve its community.

  • If you have been wondering about the various operational components and the associated technology counterparts involved with running a data science repository, then the presentation by ICPSR is for you. Participants in that panel will leave with an understanding of how the Archonnex Architecture at ICPSR is strengthening the data services offered to new researchers and much more.

Data processing

Be sure to check out the aforementioned infrastructure offerings if you’re interested in data processing, but also check out a half-day workshop on 31 May, “Text Processing with Regular Expressions,” presented by Harrison Dekker, UC Berkeley, that will help you learn regular expression syntax and how to use it in R, Python, and on the command line. The workshop will be example-driven.

Data visualisation

If you are comfortable working with quantitative data and are familiar with the R tool for statistical computing and want to learn how to create a variety of visualisations, then the workshop by the University of Minnesota on 31 May is for you. It will introduce the logic behind ggplot2 and give participants hands-on experience creating data visualizations with this package. This session will also introduce participants to related tools for creating interactive graphics from this syntax.

Programming

  • If you’re interesting in programming there’s a full-day Intro to Python for Data Wrangling workshop on 31 May, led by Tim Dennis, UC San Diego,  that will provide tools to use scientific notebooks in the cloud, write basic Python programs, integrate disparate csv files and more.

  • Also, the aforementioned Regular Expressions workshop also on 31 May will offer  in-workshop opportunities  to working with real data and perform representative data cleaning and validation operations in multiple languages.

Research data management

  • Get a behind-the-scenes look at data management and see how an organization such as the Odum Institute manages its archiving workflows, head to “Automating Archive Policy Enforcement using Dataverse and iRODS” on 31 May with presenters from the UNC Odom Institute, UNC Chapel Hill. ’Participants will see machine actionable rules in practice and be introduced to an environment where written policies can be expressed in ways an archive can automate their enforcement.

  • Another good half-day workshop, targeted to for people tasked with teaching good research data management practices to researchers is  “Teaching Research Data Management Skills Using Resources and Scenarios Based on Real Data,” 31 May, with presenters from ICPSR, the UK Data Archive and FORS. The organisers of this workshop will showcase recent examples of how they have developed teaching resources for hands-on-training, and will talk about successes and failures in this regard.

Tools

If you’re just looking to add more resources to your data revolution toolbox, whether it’s metadata, teaching, data management, open and restricted access, or documentation, here’s a quick list of highlights:

  • At Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (31 May), presenters from New York University will provide hands-on experience in creating GeoBlacklight geospatial metadata, including demos on how to capture, export, and store GeoBlacklight metadata.

  • DDI Tools Demo (1 June). The Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) is an international standard for describing statistical and social science data.

  • DDI tools: No Tools, No Standard (3 June), where participants will be introduced to the work of the DDI Developers Community and get an overview of tools available from the community.

Open-access

As mandates for better accessibility of data affects more researchers, dive into the Conversation with these IASSIST offerings:

Metadata

Don’s miss IASSIST 2016’s offerings on metadata, which is the data about the data that makes finding and working with data easier to do. There are many offerings, with a quick list of highlights below:

  • Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (Half-day workshop, 31 May), with presenters from New York University

  • At Posters and Snacks on 2 June, Building A Metadata Portfolio For Cessda, with presenters from the Finnish Social Science Data Archive; GESIS – Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences; and UK Data Service

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16. 


A story by Dory Knight-Ingram (
ICPSR)

Interested in the “data revolution” and what it means for research? Here’s why you should attend IASSIST2016

 

Part 1: Data sharing, new data sources and data protection

IASSIST is an international organisation of information technology and data services professionals which aims to provide support to research and teaching in the social sciences. It has over 300 members ranging from data archive staff and librarians to statistical agencies, government departments and non-profit organisations.

The theme of this year’s conference is Embracing the ‘data revolution’: opportunities and challenges for research” and it is the 42nd of its kind, taking place every year. IASSIST2016 will take place in Bergen, Norway, from 31 May to 3 June, hosted by NSD - Norwegian Centre for Research Data.

Here is a first snapshot of what is there and why it is important.

Data sharing

If you have ever wondered whether data sharing is to the advantage of researchers, there will be a session led by Utrecht University Library exploring the matter. The first results of a survey which explores personal beliefs, intention and behaviour regarding the sharing of data will also be presented by GESIS. The relationship between data sharing and data citation, relatively overlooked until now, will then be addressed by the Australian Data Archive.

If you are interested in how a data journal could incentivise replications in economics, you should think about attending a session by ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics which will present some studies describing the outcome of replication attempts and discuss the meaning of failed replications in economics.

GESIS will then look into improving research data sharing by addressing different scholarly target groups such as individual researchers, academic institutions, or scientific journals, all of which place diverse demands on a data sharing tool. They will focus on the tools offered by GESIS as well as a joint tool, “SowiDataNet”, offered together with the Social Science Centre Berlin, the German Institute for Economic Research, and the German National Library of Economic.

The UKDA and UKDS will present a paper which seeks to explore the role that case studies of research can play in regard to effective data sharing, reuse and impact.

The Data Archive in Finland (FSD) will also be presented as a case study of an archive that is broadening its services to the health sciences and humanities, disciplines in which data sharing practices have not yet been established.

If you’d like to know more about data accessibility, which is being required by journals and mandated by government funders, join a diverse group of open data experts as IASSIST dives into open data dialogue that includes presentations on Open Data and Citizen Empowerment and 101 Cool Things to do with Open Data as part of the “Opening up on open data workshop.” Presenters will be from archives from across the globe.

New data sources

A talk entitled “Data science: The future of social science?” by UKDA will introduce its conceptual and technical work in developing a big data platform for social science and outline preliminary findings from work using energy data.

If you have been wondering about the role of social media data in the academic environment, the session by the University of California will include an overview of the social media data landscape and the Crimson Hexagon product.

The three Vs of big data, volume, variety and velocity, are being explored in the “Hybrid Data Lake” being built by UKDA using the Universal Decimal Classification platform and expanding “topics” search while using big data management. Find out more about it as well as possible future applications.

Data protection

If you follow data protection issues, the panel on “Data protection: legal and ethical reviews” is for you, starting off with a presentation of the Administrative Data Research Network's (ADRN) Citizen's Panel, which look at public concerns about research using administrative data, the content of which is both personal and confidential. The ADRN was set up as part of the UK Government’s Big Data initiative as a UK-wide partnership between universities, government bodies, national statistics authorities and the wider research community.

The next ADRN presentation within this session will outline their application process and the role of the Approvals Panel in relation to ethical review. The aim is “to expand the discussion towards a broader reflection on the ethical dilemmas that administrative data pose”, as well as present some steps taken to address these difficulties.

NSD will then present the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), recently adopted at EU level, and explain how it will affect data collection, data use, data preservation and data sharing. If you have been wondering how the regulation will influence the possibilities for processing personal data for research purposes, or how personal data are defined, what conditions apply to an informed consent, or in which cases it is legal and ethical to conduct research without the consent of the data subjects, this presentation is for you.

The big picture

Wednesday 1 June will kick-off with a plenary entitled “Data for decision-makers: Old practice - new challenges” by Gudmund Hernes, the current president of the International Social Science Council and Norway’s former Minister of Education and Research 1990-95, and Minister of Health 1995-97.

The third day of the conference (2 June) will begin with a plenary - “Embracing the ‘Data Revolution’: Opportunities and Challenges for Research’ or ‘What you need to know about the data landscape to keep up to date”, by Matthew Woollard, Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex and Director of the UK Data Service.

If you want to know more about the three European projects under the framework of the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission that CESSDA is involved in, one on big data (Big Data Europe - Empowering Communities with Data Technologies), another on - strengthening and widening the European infrastructure for social science data archives (CESSDA SaW) and a third on synergies for Europe's Research Infrastructures in the Social Sciences (SERISS), this panel is for you.  

"Don't Hate the Player, Hate the Game": Strategies for Discussing and Communicating Data Services” considers how libraries might strategically reconsider communications about data services.

Keep an eye on this blog for more news in the run-up to IASSIST2016.

Find out more on the IASSIST2016 website.

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Bergen! 


A story by Eleanor Smith (CESSDA)

IASSIST 2014 Conference Submission Deadline EXTENDED to December 20

By popular request (and due to the tight holiday schedule this year), the IASSIST 2014 Conference Programme Committee has extended the conference submission deadline!

Submissions for all formats are now due December 20, 2013.

Thank you for all of your submissions to date, we look forward to the review.

Please let us know if you have any questions - email.

Best,

Program Chairs

Jen Green
Johan Fihn
Chuck Humphrey

(And in case this is new to you...)

The theme of the conference  is "Aligning Data and Research Infrastructure" and the meeting will be held in Toronto, Canada 3-6 June 2014.  The conference program emphasizes three tracks:  Research Data Management, Professional Development, and Data Developers and Tools.  Participants may propose individual papers, complete sessions, poster/demonstrations, Pecha Kucha, roundtable discussions, and workshops.

Conference overview: http://www.library.yorku.ca/cms/iassist/
Call for Papers: http://www.library.yorku.ca/cms/iassist/call-for-papers/
Online submissions: http://staff.lib.muohio.edu/~sekyerk/iassist14/
Workshop proposals: email Workshop Coordinator Lynda Kellam

Please spread the word about the impending submission deadline and IASSIST's exciting 40th Anniversary conference!

IASSIST 2014 Call for Papers

ALIGNING DATA AND RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE
IASSIST 2014 Annual Conference Call for Paper and Session Proposals

This year’s conference theme touches upon the international and interdisciplinary requirements of aligning data and research infrastructure. The 2013 OECD Global Science Forum report on New Data for Understanding the Human Condition identifies key challenges for international data collaboration that beg for new solutions. Among these challenges is the mounting pressure for new forms of social science data. In today’s abundance of personal data, new methods are being sought to combine traditional social science data (administrative, survey, and census data) with new forms of personal data (social networking, biomarkers or transaction data) or with data from other domains. Similarly, the need for open data, archiving, and long-term curation infrastructures has been identified for research data in the natural, physical, and life sciences. Funders in all areas are pushing to enable the replication and/or reuse of research data. What alignments are needed between data and research infrastructure to enable these possibilities?

The international research community is in the midst of building a global data ecosystem that consists of a mixture of domain data repositories, data archives, data libraries, and data services and that seeks ways to facilitate data discovery, integration, access, and preservation. Evidence of this transformation is found in the recently established ICSU World Data System and in the Research Data Alliance. Like IASSIST, these organisations are contributing to the development of a global data ecosystem. Alignment or unification of strategies must take place at many levels to achieve this. How do we proceed? What advancements are needed in research data management, research infrastructure, and the development of new expertise?

Conference Tracks

We welcome submissions on the theme outlined above and encourage conference participants to propose papers and sessions that will be of interest to a diverse audience. To facilitate the organisation and scheduling of sessions, three distinct tracks have been established. If you are unsure which track your submission belongs or you feel that it applies to more than one track, submit your proposal and if accepted, the Programme Committee will find an appropriate fit.

Track 1: Research Data Management

  • New data types and their management
  • Challenges in exchanging research data across disciplines
  • Using social science data with data from other domains
  • Data linkage in the creation of new social science data
  • Data management within the global research data ecosystem
  • Data archives and repositories in the global data ecosystem
  • Best practices in the global data ecosystem
  • Metadata enabling the interoperability of research data
  • Application of DDI, SDMX, other metadata schema, taxonomies or ontologies in research data management
  • Data management policies and workflow systems
  • Data attribution and citation systems

Track 2: Professional Development

  • Training challenges given the growing number of professional positions within the global data ecosystem, which includes data curators, data scientists, data librarians, data archivists, etc.
  • Teaching end-users to work with research data
  • Data and statistical literacy
  • Data collection development in libraries and other institutions
  • Explorations of data across subject areas and geographic regions
  • Copyright clearance, privacy and confidential data
  • Working with ethics review boards and research service offices
  • Interdisciplinarity – promoting the cross-use of data
  • Training researchers about research data management planning
  • Liaison librarians’ roles in research data

Track 3: Data Developers and Tools

  • New infrastructure requirements in the global data ecosystem
  • Infrastructure supporting Data Without Borders
  • Tools to develop and support new social science data
  • Crowdsourcing applications in producing new social science data
  • Data dives or hackathons
  • API development supporting research data management
  • Open data web services
  • Applications of research data visualisation in the social sciences
  • Preservation tools for research data
  • Tools for data mining
  • Data technology platforms: cloud computing and open stack storage
Conference Formats

The Programme Committee welcomes submissions employing any of the following formats:

Individual proposal
This format consists of a 15 to 20 minute talk that is typically accompanied with a written paper. If your individual proposal is accepted, you will be grouped into an appropriate session with similarly themed presentations.
Session proposal
Session proposals consist of an identified set of presenters and their topics. Such proposals can suggest a variety of formats, e.g. a set of three to four presentations, a discussion panel, a discussion with the audience, etc. If accepted, the person who proposed the session becomes the session organiser and is responsible for securing speakers/participants and a chair/moderator (if not standing in that role him/herself).
Pecha Kucha proposal
A proposal for this programme event consists of a presentation of 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each, with heavy emphasis on visual content. Presentations in this event are timed and speakers are restricted to seven minutes.
Poster or demonstrations proposal
Proposals in this category should identify the message being conveyed in a poster or the nature of the demonstration being made.
Round table discussion proposal
Round table discussions typically take place during lunch and have limited seating. Please indicate how you plan to share the output of your round table discussion with all of IASSIST.

Session formats are not limited to the ideas above and session organisers are welcome to suggest other formats.

All submissions should include the proposed title and an abstract no longer than 200 words (note: longer abstracts will be returned to be shortened before being considered). Please note that all presenters are required to register and pay the registration fee for the conference. Registration for individual days will be available.

Please use this online submission form to submit your proposal. If you are unsure which track your submission fits or if you feel it belongs in more than one track, the Program Committee will find an appropriate place.

We also welcome workshop proposals around the same themes. Successful proposals will blend lecture and active learning techniques. The conference planning committee will provide the necessary classroom space and computing supplies for workshops. For previous examples of IASSIST workshops, please see the descriptions of 2011 workshops and 2013 workshops. Typically workshops are half-day with 2-hour and 3-hour options.

  • Deadline for submission: December 9, 2013 (2013.12.09)
  • Notification of acceptance: February 7, 2014 (2014.02.07).
Program Chairs
  • Johan Fihn
  • Jen Green
  • Chuck Humphrey

IASSIST 2013 - Early bird registration rates until April 30!

GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences is proud to host the IASSIST 2013 Conference at Maternushaus in Cologne, Germany from May 28-31.  The IASSIST 2013 theme is Data Innovation: Increasing Accessibility, Visibility and Sustainability.  In line with the theme, the IASSIST Program is streamed into three tracks this year: Research Data Management, Data Developers and Tools and Data Public Services.  Presentations cover topics such as standards and processes in data management, metadata extensions and tools, data citation practices, sensitive data and much more! To see the full program and to register visit the website here: http://www.iassist2013.org/iassist-2013-home/.  Early bird registration rates are still available until April 30th.  See you in Cologne! (IASSIST 2013 Program and Local Arrangements Committees)

40 years of IASSIST Conferences: Toronto to host IASSIST 2014

IASSIST Members,

I'm pleased to announce that IASSIST's 40th anniversary conference in 2014 has been awarded to the city where it all started - Toronto, Canada!

Come join us to celebrate June 3-6, 2014, where local hosts from Ryerson University, the University of Toronto, and York University are looking forward to quoting Tourism Toronto's greeting of "Welcome to Toronto! We've been expecting you!"

Meanwhile, our friends at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences are gearing up to host IASSIST 2013 in Cologne, Germany from May 28 –31.  The theme of this year's conference is "Data Innovation:  Increasing Accessibility, Visibility, and Sustainability."  Stay tuned for conference acceptances notices; they will be delivered by February 5.  http://www.iassist2013.org/iassist-2013-home/

Finally, I'm currently accepting proposals for IASSIST 2015 and beyond.  If your organization is interested in hosting a future IASSIST conference, please drop me a note; you will find more information about hosting at http://www.iassistdata.org/conferences/hosting.html.

Bis Köln,

Bill Block

IASSIST President

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

    more...

  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

    • LinkedIn
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...