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Professional Development

Issues related to training and education in data services and data libraries

Bad Data Examples Appeal

Back in early April, I canvassed the IASSIST list for examples of articles, studies, or any publication that misuses data.  My original message:

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RIN Consultation paper on stewardship of research data

The RIN (Research Information Network) has recently published a draft consultation paper - Stewardship of digital research data: a framework of principles and guidelines (April 2007) and are seeking feedback from practitioners.

The draft discusses the shared framework of principles and guidelines required for key stakeholders (researchers, research institutions, funding bodies, libraries, data managers, learned societies and publishers) in order to maximise the potential benefits of digital research data and to help ensure that ‘ideas and knowledge derived from publicly-funded research should be made available and accessible for public use, interrogation, and scrutiny, as widely, rapidly and effectively as practicable.’

In addition to a collaborative approach the paper highlights the need to make explicit the roles and responsibilities of the key players in the research and research communications processes whilst remaining sensitive to: the needs of the researcher; the context in which the research is conducted; the requirements of different kinds of research data (words, numbers, pictures, sound); how the data were generated (purpose and process) and by whom.

RIN believes there are 5 principles reflecting the research data lifecycle which should be adopted by universities, colleges, research institutions and funding bodies, namely:

Roles and responsibilities – collaborative codes of practice

Standards and quality assurance – creation and collection in accordance with international standards

Access, usage and credit – easy to find and easy to use

Benefits and cost effectiveness – efficient data management and access

Preservation and sustainability – accessibility for current and future generations

To read the full draft paper visit: http://www.rin.ac.uk/data-principles. Please send any comments to Stephane Goldstein (Stephane.goldstein@rin.ac.uk) by 29 June 2007.

- Stuart Macdonald

Academic libraries and data

Shawn Nicholson pointed out on the IASSIST list:

 

"As a follow on to the talk we heard in Ann Arbor, this set of PowerPoint presentations might be of interest: http://www.arl.org/info/events/ncr "

 

NSF Workshop on New Collaborative Relationships: The Role of Academic Libraries in the Digital Data Universe

Q and A on data-librarianship

During the colloquy hosted by the Chronicle of Higher Education today, there were a number of questions about the role of libraries and librarians in preservation of and access to data. Although the focus was on e-science more than social science, the questions and answers might be of interest. All the questions and answers are available here. D. Scott Brandt, associate dean of libraries at Purdue University, is helping to build a repository of scientific data.

 

-- jim jacobs

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Cataloging query: how does cataloging data differ from traditional library material?

In their never ending quest for information, Jen, Tiffani and Paula would like to know about people's experiences cataloging data. Do you use MARC format? Have you tried using DDI? At what level do you tend to catalog collections? How does it depart from cataloging traditional library matter? Enquiring minds want to know.

 

- Contributed by Jen Darragh

Defining Data Librarian - call for comments

Tiffani Conner, Paula Lackie and Jen Darragh are working on the handouts for an ALA poster session and have found that defining "data" and "data librarian" clearly, in a concise manner, for a non-data audience is really hard. In addition, some of the sources they consulted (the Online Dictionary of Library and Information Science - ODLIS , Oxford English Dictionary ) were not adequate (ODLIS has data, data set, social science data set but the definitions are not that great). They also looked at Wikipedia, and there is nothing for data librarian. more...

New report on Eurostat and statistical integration

Title: Administering information: Eurostat and statistical integration

 

The chapter examines developments and changes in the organization of numerical information in the EU, in particular the role of Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Commission. How and to what extent can we observe the emergence of a pan-European informational system?

 

Full Text (PDF, 31 pages, 157.2 KB) http://www.arena.uio.no/publications/working-papers2005/papers/wp05_27.pdfTitle: Administering information: Eurostat and statistical integration

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Data Literacy in the Spotlight

The IASSIST Quarterly focuses on data literacy

Report on Access to Scientific Research Data

The final report of the Canadian National Consultation on Access to Scientific Research Data has just been released containing eighteen recommendations to improve open access to research data in Canada. While some of these recommendations are unique to the Canadian context, others share a close relationship with the recommendations of the International Council for Science report, Scientific Data and Information.Supported by the National Research Council of Canada, a task force was established in June 2004 to provide advice about improving access to scientific research data. more...

Discovering a Profession: the accidental data librarian

A session at the Edinburgh conference addressed a topic that arose earlier in the year on the IASSIST email discussion list about how people prepare and enter the profession of data librarianship. In general, is there a profession of data librarianship?An interesting question was presented on the IASSIST email discussion list earlier this year asking how one becomes a data librarian. Several people replied by relating personal accounts about their entry into this profession. Out of this discussion came the observation that many were 'accidental' data librarians, that is, they had not pursued a career as a data librarian but by happenstance discovered the profession.

This conversation was continued in a session at the Edinburgh conference: E4. Discovering a Profession: the accidental data librarian. Speaking in this session, Paul Bern (Syracuse University) questioned whether data librarianship qualifies as a real profession. He listed three attributes that W.M. Sullivan in Work and Integrity (2005) uses to characterize a profession:

  • a commitment to public service
  • public recognition of a degree of autonomy to regulate themselves
  • specialized training in a field of codified knowledge.

Paul noted that the first characteristic is one on which we clearly qualify as a profession. Data librarians are known for their dedication to public service. How data librarianship measures up to the next two characteristics, however, is debatable. This blog entry is dedicated to continuing this debate.

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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  • Resources

    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

  • community

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    Find out what IASSISTers are doing in the field and explore other avenues of presentation, communication and discussion via social networking and related online social spaces. more...