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Articles and news of interest to IASSIST members

IQ Volume 40 Issue 3 now available

Issue 40(3) is now online at http://www.iassistdata.org/iq/issue/40/3.

Editor’s Notes

Being international - and proud of it!

IASSIST is proud of being international. These days some us of find it important to emphasize how international collaboration has improved and made our lives more efficient. In the small but around-the-globe-reaching world of IASSIST, many national data archives have come into existence as well as continuing their development, through friendly international support and spreading of knowledge and good practices among IASSISTers. So let us cherish the 'International' in IASSIST. We are proud of the lead 'I' for 'International' in the IASSIST acronym and have no intention of changing that to 'N' for 'National'. It is also my impression that data archives all over the world simply don't have the facilities for storing 'alternative facts' as they are shy of all kinds of documentation.

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:3, 2016). Four papers with authors from three continents are presented in this issue. The paper 'Demonstrating Repository Trustworthiness through the Data Seal of Approval' is a summary of a panel session at the IASSIST 2015 conference in Minneapolis with panel members Stuart Macdonald, Ingrid Dillo, Sophia Lafferty-Hess, Lynn Woolfrey, and Mary Vardigan. The paper has an introduction from DANS in the Netherlands where the Data Seal of Approval (DSA) originated. Cases from the US and South Africa are presented and the future of the DSA including possible harmonization with other systems is discussed. DSA certifications are basically consumer guidance, clearly assisting all the involved parties. Depositors and funding bodies will be assured that data are reliably stored, researchers can reliably access the data repositories, and repositories are supported in their work of archiving and distribution of data.

The second article brings us to the actual use of data. From the UK Data Service, Rebecca Parsons and Scott Summers in 'The Role of Case Studies in Effective Data Sharing, Reuse and Impact' take us into positive narratives around secondary data. The background is that although the publishing of data is now recognised by funders, the authors find that ‘showcasing’ brings motivation for data sharing and reuse as well as improving the quality of data and documentation. The impact of case studies is all-sided and research, depositing data, and the brand recognition of the UK Data Service are among the areas investigated. The future is likely to include new case studies developed for use in teaching in schools, with easy linking to datasets, as well as for researchers being assisted to build their own portfolios. The appendix presents case studies on research and impact.

In the third article, we are situated in data creation. Muhammad F. Bhuiyan and Paula Lackie from Carleton College in Minnesota write on 'Mitigating Survey Fraud and Human Error: Lessons Learned from A Low Budget Village Census in Bangladesh'. As the 'fraud' term implies, they are looking into the problem of data creators being too creative, but more importantly they are investigating the essential area of data quality. The authors explain how selected technological assets like the use of geographic information systems (GIS) and audio-capturing smart pens improved data quality. The use of these tools is exemplified through many scenarios described in the paper. Furthermore, a procedure of daily monitoring and fast transcription lead to quick surveyor re-training and dismissal of others, thus minimising data errors. For those interested in false data and its detection, the introduction in particular has valuable references to literature.

In the last paper the difficult task of handling images is addressed in 'Image Management as a Data Service' by Berenica Vejvoda, K. Jane Burpee, and Paula Lackie. Vejvoda and Burpee work at McGill University in Montreal. You have already met Lackie from Carleton College in relation to the third paper above. The 'images' in the article are digital images, and the authors suggest that the knowledge of digital data services across the 'research data lifecycle' also benefits the management of digital images. Digital images are numerical data, and the article compares the data, metadata, and paradata of a survey respondent to the information on a digital image. Considerations from normal data concerning system formats and storage space also apply to management of images. In the last section the paper introduces copyright issues that are complicated, to say the least. Just as reuse of normal data can have ethical angles, it is even more apparent that images can have complicated issues of privacy and confidentiality.

Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistd ata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen

January 2017

Editor

IASSIST Quarterly (IQ) volume 40-2 is now on the website: Revolution in the air

Welcome to the second issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 40:2, 2016). We present three papers in this issue.

http://iassistdata.org/iq/issue/40/2

First, there are two papers on the Data Documentation Initiative that have their own special introduction. I want to express my respect and gratitude to Joachim Wackerow (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences). Joachim (Achim) and Mary Vardigan (University of Michigan) have several times and for many years communicated to and advised the readers of the IASSIST Quarterly on the continuing development of the DDI. The metadata of data is central for the use and reuse of data, and we have come a long way through the efforts of many people.    

The IASSIST 2016 conference in Bergen was a great success - I am told. I was not able to attend but heard that the conference again was 'the best ever'. I was also told that among the many interesting talks and inputs at the conference Matthew Woollard's keynote speech on 'Data Revolution' was high on the list. Good to have well informed informers! Matthew Woollard is Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. Here in the IASSIST Quarterly we bring you a transcript of his talk. Woollard starts his talk on the data revolution with the possibility of bringing to users access to data, rather than bringing data to users. The data is in the 'cloud' - in the air - 'Revolution in the air' to quote a Nobel laureate. We are not yet in the post-revolutionary phase and many issues still need to be addressed. Woollard argues that several data skills are in demand, like an understanding of data management and of the many ethical issues. Although he is not enthusiastic about the term 'Big Data', Woollard naturally addresses the concept as these days we cannot talk about data - and surely not about data revolution - without talking about Big Data. I fully support his view that we should proceed with caution, so that we are not simply replacing surveys where we 'ask more from fewer' with big data that give us 'less from more'. The revolution gives us new possibilities, and we will see more complex forms of research that will challenge data skills and demand solutions at data service institutions.  

Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors 'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in your local repository. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout:

http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk. Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen   
Editor, IASSIST Quarterly

IASSIST's Statement in Response to President’s Executive Order on Visas and Immigration


February 13, 2017

Statement of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST at http://iassistdata.org) in response to President Trump's January 27 Executive Order on Visas and Immigration, titled "PROTECTING THE NATION FROM FOREIGN TERRORIST ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES".

The recent executive order on visas and immigration issued on January 27th by US President Trump is of grave concern to IASSIST as an organization. IASSIST, the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology, is an international organization of professionals working in and with information technology, libraries, data services and research & higher education to support open science, advocate for responsible data management and use, build a broader community surrounding research data, and encourage the development of data professionals. Our membership is international, and we greatly value the ability to travel and meet to share knowledge at locations around the world. Our international fellows program and other initiatives are specifically designed to encourage participation from underrepresented regions, including the Muslim-majority countries targeted by the executive order.

While recognizing the authority of the United States over its borders, there are several aspects of this order that are troubling, viz.:

  1. Its sudden and chaotic implementation has led to severe uncertainty over whether rules and practices for entering the United States will be subject to rapid and arbitrary change.
  2. It has led to the detention of lawful permanent residents of the United States, the revocation of visas previously granted under proper vetting procedures, the perception of potential discrimination on the basis of religion, and the humanitarian crisis caused by ceasing to accept refugees.
  3. Its introduction of several restrictive elements into the domain of visas and immigration, such as the statement that those entering the US, including temporary visitors, must "support the Constitution".

For these reasons, the order generates a hostile climate for the open, collaborative scientific work of our organization, both for non-US persons seeking to work and collaborate with Americans, and for Americans traveling and working outside of the US to collaborate who may face retributive actions from other states. Our membership has legitimate concerns about whether travel to the US is possible under such conditions. The order also may have long-term repercussions that damage the reputation of the US as a location that is open to visitors and immigrants, supporting the open exchange of ideas, and protected under the rule of law from arbitrary changes impacting human freedom. In response, IASSIST will continue to speak out in favor of our organization's goals, and against such threats to international collaboration in research and data sharing.

Our May 2017 annual conference will be held in Lawrence, Kansas. Arrangements were begun long before the Executive Order on Visas and Immigration, and it is impossible to change the venue at this date. IASSIST stands in solidarity with its members and encourages them to attend the conference and participate in the international exchange of ideas that is the purpose of our association. We hope that no member will be denied entry into the US due to the administration's recent actions. IASSIST will assist its membership with visa issues and other concerns emanating from this order. We also reaffirm that we are committed to an environment free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, at the annual conference and all IASSIST activities.

 Tuomas J. Alaterä, President
 Jen Green, Vice-President
 Ryan Womack, Secretary
 Thomas Lindsay, Treasurer

International Association for Social Science Information Service and Technology (IASSIST)

IASSIST Call for Event Sponsorship Proposals

The IASSIST Liaison and Organizational Sponsorship Task Force is seeking proposals for sponsorships of regional or local events during calendar year 2017. The goal of these sponsorships is to support local networks of data professionals and data-related activities across the globe in order to help support IASSISTers activities throughout the year and increase awareness of the value of IASSIST membership.

Events should be a gathering of data professionals from multiple institutions and may vary in size and scope from workshops, symposia, conferences, etc. These may be established events or new endeavors. We are particularly looking to sponsor regional or local level events that will attract data professionals who would benefit from IASSIST membership, but may not always be able to travel to attend IASSIST conferences. Preference will be given to events from geographic areas outside of traditional IASSIST conference locations (North America and Western Europe), and from underrepresented membership areas as such as Latin/South America, Africa, Asia/Pacific, and Eastern Europe.

Requests for sponsorships may be monetary, and may also include a request for mentorship assistance by matching the event planning committee with an experienced IASSIST member with relevant expertise (e.g., conference planning, subject/content, geographic familiarity).

Accepted events will be required to designate an active IASSIST member as the liaison. Generally, this would be an IASSIST member who will be attending the event and although not required, may be on the planning committee or otherwise contributing to the event. The liaison will be responsible for assistance with coordinating logistics related to the sponsorship, ensuring that the sponsorship is recognized at the event, and contributing a post to the IASSIST iBlog about the event.

Proposals should include:

  • Name of the event and event details (date, location, any other pertinent information)
  • Organizing or hosting institution
  • Description of event and how it relates to IASSIST goals and communities
  • Specific request for sponsorship: amount of money and/or mentorship assistance
  • Description of how the sponsorship will be used
  • Name and contact information of person submitting proposal and designated event liaison to IASSIST (if different)

Proposals are due on Friday, January 13 2017 via the Application Form. Notification of sponsorship awards will be by Friday, Feb 3 2017. The number and monetary extent of awarded sponsorships will depend on the number and quality of applications received. Individual sponsorship requests may range from $0 USD (request for mentorship only) to $2,000 USD.

Please direct questions to Hailey Mooney, IASSIST Membership Chair (haileym@umich.edu).

IASSIST sponsors IFLA 2016 Knowledge Management conference

IASSIST proudly sponsored a full-day conference about knowledge management (KM) on August 12, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA at the University of Cincinnati. The theme of the conference was Sharing Practices and Actions for Making Best Use of Organizational Knowledge in Libraries.The conference took place as part of the International Federation of Library Associations' (IFLA) annual conference held this year in Columbus, Ohio, USA.

The KM conference featured two keynote speakers: Valerie Forrestal, author of the 2015 book Knowledge Management in Libraries, and Jay Liebowitz, whose most recent book Successes and Failures of Knowledge Management was published just this year.

In addition to the keynotes, we had six scholarly presentations from information professionals on a variety of KM topics. Five of the accepted papers are available full-text. Outside of the United States, we had speakers and audience members visit us from Canada, China, and Iran.

The entire IFLA Knowledge Management Section thanks IASSIST for their sponsorship of the conference. In the future, we hope that our section can work collaboratively with IASSIST in the shared interest of information, knowledge, and data topics worldwide.

I hope to see many of you at IASSIST 2017 in Lawrence, Kansas!

Spencer Acadia, IFLA KM 2016 Program Chair and Standing Committee Member, acadias1@gmail.com

IQ 40:1 Now Available!

Our World and all the Local Worlds
Welcome to the first issue of Volume 40 of the IASSIST
Quarterly (IQ 40:1, 2016). We present four papers in this issue.
The first paper presents data from our very own world,
extracted from papers published in the IQ through four
decades. What is published in the IQ is often limited in
geographical scope and in this issue the other three papers
present investigations and project research carried out at
New York University, Purdue University, and the Federal
Reserve System. However, the subject scope of the papers
and the methods employed bring great diversity. And
although the papers are local in origin they all have a strong
focus for generalization in order to spread the information
and experience.


We proudly present the paper that received the 'best
paper award' at the IASSIST conference 2015. Great thanks
are expressed to all the reviewers who took part in the
evaluation! In the paper 'Social Science Data Archives: A
Historical Social Network Analysis' the authors Kristin R.
Eschenfelder (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Morgaine
Gilchrist Scott, Kalpana Shankar, and Greg Downey
are reporting on inter-organizational influence and
collaboration among social science data archives through
data of articles published in IASSIST Quarterly in 1976
to 2014. The paper demonstrates social network analysis
(SNA) using a web of 'nodes' (people/authors/institutions)
and 'links' (relationships between nodes). Several types
of relationships are identified: influencing, collaborating,
funding, and international. The dynamics are shown in
detail by employing five year sections. I noticed that from
a reluctant start the amount of relationships has grown
significantly and archives have continuously grown better
at bringing in 'influence' from other 'nodes'. The paper
contributes to the history of social science data archives and
the shaping of a research discipline.


The paper 'Understanding Academic Patrons’ Data Needs
through Virtual Reference Transcripts: Preliminary Findings
from New York University Libraries' is authored by Margaret
Smith and Jill Conte who are both librarians at New York
University, and Samantha Guss, a librarian at University
of Richmond who worked at New York University from
2009-14. The goal of their paper is 'to contribute to the
growing body of knowledge about how information
needs are conceptualized and articulated, and how this
knowledge can be used to improve data reference in an
academic library setting'. This is carried out by analysis of
chat transcripts of requests for census data at NYU. There is
a high demand for the virtual services of the NYU Libraries
and there are as many as 15,000 annual chat transactions.
There has not been much qualitative research of users'
data needs, but here the authors exemplify the iterative
nature of grounded theory with data collection and analysis
processes inextricably entwined and also using a range of
software tools like FileLocator Pro, TextCrawler, and Dedoose.
Three years of chat reference transcripts were filtered down
to 147 transcripts related to United States and international
census data. The unique data provides several insights,
shown in the paper. However, the authors are also aware of
the limitations in the method as it did not include whether
the patron or librarian considered the interaction successful.
The conclusion is that there is a need for additional librarian
training and improved research guides.


The third paper is also from a university. Amy Barton, Paul
J. Bracke, Ann Marie Clark, all from Purdue University,
collaborated on the paper 'Digitization, Data Curation,
and Human Rights Documents: Case Study of a Library
Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration'. The project
concerns the digitization of Urgent Action Bulletins of
Amnesty International from 1974 to 2007. The political
science research centered on changes of transnational
human rights advocacy and legal instrumentation, while
the Libraries’ research related to data management,
metadata, data lifecycle, etcetera. The specific research
collaboration model developed was also generalized for
future practitioner-librarian collaboration projects. The
project is part of a recent tendency where academic
libraries will improve engagement and combine activities
between libraries and users and institutions. The project
attempts to integrate two different lifecycle models thus
serving both research and curatorial goals where the
central question is: 'can digitization processes be designed
in a manner that feeds directly into analytical workflows
of social science researchers, while still meeting the
needs of the archive or library concerned with long-term
stewardship of the digitized content?'. The project builds
on data of Urgent Action Bulletins produced by Amnesty
International for indication of how human rights concerns
changed over time, and the threats in different countries
at different periods, as well as combining library standards
for digitization and digital collections with researcher-driven
metadata and coding strategies. The data creation
started with the scanning and creation of the optical
character recognized (OCR) version of full text PDFs for text
recognition and modeling in NVivo software. The project
did succeed in developing shared standards. However, a
fundamental challenge was experienced in the grant-driven
timelines for both library and researcher. It seems to me that
the expectation of parallel work was the challenge to the
project. Things take time.


In the fourth paper we enter the case of the Federal Reserve
System. San Cannon and Deng Pan, working at the Federal
Reserve Bank in Kansas City and Chicago, created a pilot
for an infrastructure and workflow support for making the
publication of research data a regular part of the research
lifecycle. This is reported in the paper 'First Forays into
Research Data Dissemination: A Tale from the Kansas City
Fed'. More than 750 researchers across the system produce
yearly about 1,000 journal articles, working papers, etcetera.
The need for data to support the research has been
recognized, and the institution is setting up a repository
and defining a workflow to support data preservation
and future dissemination. In early 2015 the internal Center
for the Advancement of Research and Data in Economics
(CADRE) was established with a mission to support, enhance,
and advance data or computationally intensive research,
and preservation and dissemination were identified as
important support functions for CADRE. The paper presents
details and questions in the design such as types of
collections, kind and size of data files, and demonstrates
influence of testers and curators. The pilot also had to
decide on the metadata fields to be used when data is
submitted to the system. The complete setup including
incorporated fields was enhanced through pilot testing and
user feedback. The pilot is now being expanded to other
Federal Reserve Banks.


Papers for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome.
We welcome input from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or
papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time
presentation into a lasting contribution. We permit authors
'deep links' into the IQ as well as deposition of the paper in
your local repository. Chairing a conference session with
the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a
special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information
reaches many more people than the session participants,
and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at
http://www.iassistdata.org.


Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions
and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors.

Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.
Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for
the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear
from you.


Karsten Boye Rasmussen
June 2016
Editor

IASSIST 2016 Program At-A-Glance, Part 2: Data infrastructure, data processing and research data management

 

Here's another list of highlights from IASSIST2016 which is focusing on the data revolution. For previous highlights, see here.

Infrastructure

  • For those of you with an interest in technical infrastructure, the University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur will showcase an early protype MMRepo (1 June, 3F), whose function is to store qualitative and quantitative data into one big data repository.
  • The UK Data Service will present the following panel "The CESSDA Technical Framework - what is it and why is it needed?", which elaborates how the CESSDA Research Infrastructure should have modern data curation techniques rooted in sophisticated IT capabilities at its core, in order to better serve its community.

  • If you have been wondering about the various operational components and the associated technology counterparts involved with running a data science repository, then the presentation by ICPSR is for you. Participants in that panel will leave with an understanding of how the Archonnex Architecture at ICPSR is strengthening the data services offered to new researchers and much more.

Data processing

Be sure to check out the aforementioned infrastructure offerings if you’re interested in data processing, but also check out a half-day workshop on 31 May, “Text Processing with Regular Expressions,” presented by Harrison Dekker, UC Berkeley, that will help you learn regular expression syntax and how to use it in R, Python, and on the command line. The workshop will be example-driven.

Data visualisation

If you are comfortable working with quantitative data and are familiar with the R tool for statistical computing and want to learn how to create a variety of visualisations, then the workshop by the University of Minnesota on 31 May is for you. It will introduce the logic behind ggplot2 and give participants hands-on experience creating data visualizations with this package. This session will also introduce participants to related tools for creating interactive graphics from this syntax.

Programming

  • If you’re interesting in programming there’s a full-day Intro to Python for Data Wrangling workshop on 31 May, led by Tim Dennis, UC San Diego,  that will provide tools to use scientific notebooks in the cloud, write basic Python programs, integrate disparate csv files and more.

  • Also, the aforementioned Regular Expressions workshop also on 31 May will offer  in-workshop opportunities  to working with real data and perform representative data cleaning and validation operations in multiple languages.

Research data management

  • Get a behind-the-scenes look at data management and see how an organization such as the Odum Institute manages its archiving workflows, head to “Automating Archive Policy Enforcement using Dataverse and iRODS” on 31 May with presenters from the UNC Odom Institute, UNC Chapel Hill. ’Participants will see machine actionable rules in practice and be introduced to an environment where written policies can be expressed in ways an archive can automate their enforcement.

  • Another good half-day workshop, targeted to for people tasked with teaching good research data management practices to researchers is  “Teaching Research Data Management Skills Using Resources and Scenarios Based on Real Data,” 31 May, with presenters from ICPSR, the UK Data Archive and FORS. The organisers of this workshop will showcase recent examples of how they have developed teaching resources for hands-on-training, and will talk about successes and failures in this regard.

Tools

If you’re just looking to add more resources to your data revolution toolbox, whether it’s metadata, teaching, data management, open and restricted access, or documentation, here’s a quick list of highlights:

  • At Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (31 May), presenters from New York University will provide hands-on experience in creating GeoBlacklight geospatial metadata, including demos on how to capture, export, and store GeoBlacklight metadata.

  • DDI Tools Demo (1 June). The Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) is an international standard for describing statistical and social science data.

  • DDI tools: No Tools, No Standard (3 June), where participants will be introduced to the work of the DDI Developers Community and get an overview of tools available from the community.

Open-access

As mandates for better accessibility of data affects more researchers, dive into the Conversation with these IASSIST offerings:

Metadata

Don’s miss IASSIST 2016’s offerings on metadata, which is the data about the data that makes finding and working with data easier to do. There are many offerings, with a quick list of highlights below:

  • Creating GeoBlacklight Metadata: Leveraging Open Source Tools to Facilitate Metadata Genesis (Half-day workshop, 31 May), with presenters from New York University

  • At Posters and Snacks on 2 June, Building A Metadata Portfolio For Cessda, with presenters from the Finnish Social Science Data Archive; GESIS – Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences; and UK Data Service

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16. 


A story by Dory Knight-Ingram (
ICPSR)

Interested in the “data revolution” and what it means for research? Here’s why you should attend IASSIST2016

 

Part 1: Data sharing, new data sources and data protection

IASSIST is an international organisation of information technology and data services professionals which aims to provide support to research and teaching in the social sciences. It has over 300 members ranging from data archive staff and librarians to statistical agencies, government departments and non-profit organisations.

The theme of this year’s conference is Embracing the ‘data revolution’: opportunities and challenges for research” and it is the 42nd of its kind, taking place every year. IASSIST2016 will take place in Bergen, Norway, from 31 May to 3 June, hosted by NSD - Norwegian Centre for Research Data.

Here is a first snapshot of what is there and why it is important.

Data sharing

If you have ever wondered whether data sharing is to the advantage of researchers, there will be a session led by Utrecht University Library exploring the matter. The first results of a survey which explores personal beliefs, intention and behaviour regarding the sharing of data will also be presented by GESIS. The relationship between data sharing and data citation, relatively overlooked until now, will then be addressed by the Australian Data Archive.

If you are interested in how a data journal could incentivise replications in economics, you should think about attending a session by ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics which will present some studies describing the outcome of replication attempts and discuss the meaning of failed replications in economics.

GESIS will then look into improving research data sharing by addressing different scholarly target groups such as individual researchers, academic institutions, or scientific journals, all of which place diverse demands on a data sharing tool. They will focus on the tools offered by GESIS as well as a joint tool, “SowiDataNet”, offered together with the Social Science Centre Berlin, the German Institute for Economic Research, and the German National Library of Economic.

The UKDA and UKDS will present a paper which seeks to explore the role that case studies of research can play in regard to effective data sharing, reuse and impact.

The Data Archive in Finland (FSD) will also be presented as a case study of an archive that is broadening its services to the health sciences and humanities, disciplines in which data sharing practices have not yet been established.

If you’d like to know more about data accessibility, which is being required by journals and mandated by government funders, join a diverse group of open data experts as IASSIST dives into open data dialogue that includes presentations on Open Data and Citizen Empowerment and 101 Cool Things to do with Open Data as part of the “Opening up on open data workshop.” Presenters will be from archives from across the globe.

New data sources

A talk entitled “Data science: The future of social science?” by UKDA will introduce its conceptual and technical work in developing a big data platform for social science and outline preliminary findings from work using energy data.

If you have been wondering about the role of social media data in the academic environment, the session by the University of California will include an overview of the social media data landscape and the Crimson Hexagon product.

The three Vs of big data, volume, variety and velocity, are being explored in the “Hybrid Data Lake” being built by UKDA using the Universal Decimal Classification platform and expanding “topics” search while using big data management. Find out more about it as well as possible future applications.

Data protection

If you follow data protection issues, the panel on “Data protection: legal and ethical reviews” is for you, starting off with a presentation of the Administrative Data Research Network's (ADRN) Citizen's Panel, which look at public concerns about research using administrative data, the content of which is both personal and confidential. The ADRN was set up as part of the UK Government’s Big Data initiative as a UK-wide partnership between universities, government bodies, national statistics authorities and the wider research community.

The next ADRN presentation within this session will outline their application process and the role of the Approvals Panel in relation to ethical review. The aim is “to expand the discussion towards a broader reflection on the ethical dilemmas that administrative data pose”, as well as present some steps taken to address these difficulties.

NSD will then present the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), recently adopted at EU level, and explain how it will affect data collection, data use, data preservation and data sharing. If you have been wondering how the regulation will influence the possibilities for processing personal data for research purposes, or how personal data are defined, what conditions apply to an informed consent, or in which cases it is legal and ethical to conduct research without the consent of the data subjects, this presentation is for you.

The big picture

Wednesday 1 June will kick-off with a plenary entitled “Data for decision-makers: Old practice - new challenges” by Gudmund Hernes, the current president of the International Social Science Council and Norway’s former Minister of Education and Research 1990-95, and Minister of Health 1995-97.

The third day of the conference (2 June) will begin with a plenary - “Embracing the ‘Data Revolution’: Opportunities and Challenges for Research’ or ‘What you need to know about the data landscape to keep up to date”, by Matthew Woollard, Director of the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex and Director of the UK Data Service.

If you want to know more about the three European projects under the framework of the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission that CESSDA is involved in, one on big data (Big Data Europe - Empowering Communities with Data Technologies), another on - strengthening and widening the European infrastructure for social science data archives (CESSDA SaW) and a third on synergies for Europe's Research Infrastructures in the Social Sciences (SERISS), this panel is for you.  

"Don't Hate the Player, Hate the Game": Strategies for Discussing and Communicating Data Services” considers how libraries might strategically reconsider communications about data services.

Keep an eye on this blog for more news in the run-up to IASSIST2016.

Find out more on the IASSIST2016 website.

Spread the word on Twitter using #IASSIST16.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Bergen! 


A story by Eleanor Smith (CESSDA)

IASSIST will be at RDAP!

For those of you attending the RDAP Summit next week in Atlanta, GA, USA, be sure to keep an eye out for IASSIST. We are a sponsoring organization—check out the advance thank you blog post from RDAP.

Our VP, Jen Green, will be on the scene with promoting IASSIST at the poster session. Be sure to stop by to say "hi" and pick up your very own IASSIST logo button. 

Looking forward to hearing the report back from RDAP!

Latest Issue of IQ Available! Data Documentation Initiative - Results, Tools, and Further Initiatives

Welcome to the third issue of Volume 39 of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ 39:3, 2015). This special issue is guest edited by Joachim Wackerow of GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences in Germany and Mary Vardigan of ICPSR at the University of Michigan, USA. That sentence is a direct plagiarism from the editor’s notes of the recent double issue (IQ 38:4 & 39:1). We are very grateful for all the work Mary and Achim have carried out and are developing further in the continuing story of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI), and for their efforts in presenting the work here in the ASSIST Quarterly.

As in the recent double issue on DDI this special issue also presents results, tools, and further initiatives. The DDI started 20 years ago and much has been accomplished. However, creative people are still refining and improving it, as well as developing new areas for the use of DDI.

Mary Vardigan and Joachim Wackerow give on the next page an overview of the content of DDI papers in this issue.

Let me then applaud the two guest editors and also the many authors who made this possible:

  • Alerk Amin, RAND Cooperation, www.rand.org, USA
  • Ingo Barkow, Associate Professor for Data Management at the University for Applied Sciences Eastern Switzerland (HTW Chur), Switzerland
  • Stefan Kramer, American University, Washington, DC, USA
  • David Schiller, Research Data Centre (FDZ) of the German Federal Employment Agency (BA) at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
  • Jeremy Williams, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, USA
  • Larry Hoyle, senior scientist at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas, USA
  • Joachim Wackerow, metadata expert at GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany
  • William Poynter, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jennifer Spiegel, UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
  • Jay Greenfield, health informatics architect working with data standards, USA
  • Sam Hume, vice president of SHARE Technology and Services at CDISC, USA
  • Sanda Ionescu, user support for data and documentation, ICPSR, USA
  • Jeremy Iverson, co-founder and partner at Colectica, USA
  • John Kunze, systems architect at the California Digital Library, USA
  • Barry Radler, researcher at the University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging, USA
  • Wendy Thomas, director of the Data Access Core in the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) at the University of Minnesota, USA
  • Mary Vardigan, archivist at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), USA
  • Stuart Weibel, worked in OCLC Research, USA
  • Michael Witt, associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, USA.

I hope you will enjoy their work in this issue, and I am certain that the contact authors will enjoy hearing from you
about new potential results, tools, and initiatives.

Articles for the IASSIST Quarterly are always very welcome. They can be papers from IASSIST conferences or other
conferences and workshops, from local presentations or papers especially written for the IQ. When you are preparing
a presentation, give a thought to turning your one-time presentation into a lasting contribution to continuing development. As an author you are permitted ‘deep links’ where you link directly to your paper published in the IQ. Chairing a conference session with the purpose of aggregating and integrating papers for a special issue IQ is also much appreciated as the information reaches many more people than the session participants, and will be readily available on the IASSIST website at http://www.iassistdata.org.

Authors are very welcome to take a look at the instructions and layout: http://iassistdata.org/iq/instructions-authors. Authors can also contact me via e-mail: kbr@sam.sdu.dk.

Should you be interested in compiling a special issue for the IQ as guest editor(s) I will also be delighted to hear from you.

Karsten Boye Rasmussen
September 2015
Editor

New Perspectives on DDI

This issue features four papers that look at leveraging the structured metadata provided by DDI in
different ways. The first, “Design Considerations for DDI-Based Data Systems,“ aims to help decisionmakers
by highlighting the approach of using relational databases for data storage in contrast to
representing DDI in its native XML format. The second paper, “DDI as a Common Format for Export
and Import for Statistical Packages,” describes an experiment using the program Stat/Transfer to
move datasets among five popular packages with DDI Lifecycle as an intermediary format. The paper
“Protocol Development for Large-Scale Metadata Archiving Using DDI Lifecycle” discusses the use
of a DDI profile to document CLOSER (Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources,
www.closer.ac.uk), which brings together nine of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies by producing a
metadata discovery platform (MDP). And finally, “DDI and Enhanced Data Citation“ reports on efforts in
extend data citation information in DDI to include a larger set of elements and a taxonomy for the role
of research contributors.

Mary Vardigan - vardigan@umich.edu
Joachim Wackerow - Joachim.Wackerow@gesis.org

  • IASSIST Quarterly

    Publications Special issue: A pioneer data librarian
    Welcome to the special volume of the IASSIST Quarterly (IQ (37):1-4, 2013). This special issue started as exchange of ideas between Libbie Stephenson and Margaret Adams to collect

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    Resources

    A space for IASSIST members to share professional resources useful to them in their daily work. Also the IASSIST Jobs Repository for an archive of data-related position descriptions. more...

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